Article

Autophagy and aging.

Department of Medical Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 0XY, UK.
Cell (Impact Factor: 33.12). 09/2011; 146(5):682-95. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2011.07.030
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Genetic inhibition of autophagy induces degenerative changes in mammalian tissues that resemble those associated with aging, and normal and pathological aging are often associated with a reduced autophagic potential. Pharmacological or genetic manipulations that increase life span in model organisms often stimulate autophagy, and its inhibition compromises the longevity-promoting effects of caloric restriction, Sirtuin 1 activation, inhibition of insulin/insulin growth factor signaling, or the administration of rapamycin, resveratrol, or spermidine. Here, we discuss the probable cause and effect relationship between perturbed autophagy and aging, as well as possible molecular mechanisms that may mediate the anti-aging effects of autophagy.

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