Association Between Vitamin D and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review of Prospective Studies

The Sixth People's Hospital affiliated with Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 600 Yishan Rd, Shanghai 200233, People's Republic of China.
Journal of Clinical Oncology (Impact Factor: 18.43). 08/2011; 29(28):3775-82. DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2011.35.7566
Source: PubMed


To conduct a systematic review of prospective studies assessing the association of vitamin D intake or blood levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] with the risk of colorectal cancer using meta-analysis.
Relevant studies were identified by a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases before October 2010 with no restrictions. We included prospective studies that reported relative risk (RR) estimates with 95% CIs for the association between vitamin D intake or blood 25(OH)D levels and the risk of colorectal, colon, or rectal cancer. Approximately 1,000,000 participants from several countries were included in this analysis.
Nine studies on vitamin D intake and nine studies on blood 25(OH)D levels were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RRs of colorectal cancer for the highest versus lowest categories of vitamin D intake and blood 25(OH)D levels were 0.88 (95% CI, 0.80 to 0.96) and 0.67 (95% CI, 0.54 to 0.80), respectively. There was no heterogeneity among studies of vitamin D intake (P = .19) or among studies of blood 25(OH)D levels (P = .96). A 10 ng/mL increment in blood 25(OH)D level conferred an RR of 0.74 (95% CI, 0.63 to 0.89).
Vitamin D intake and blood 25(OH)D levels were inversely associated with the risk of colorectal cancer in this meta-analysis.

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    • "This is also consistent with deficient vitamin D levels widely reported for cancer patients versus the general population [39] [40], even after adjusting for age, BMI and season of blood draw for the same geography [41]. Different meta-analysis have linked a higher risk of cancer with lower vitamin D levels, Ma et al. [42] "
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    Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology 05/2015; 96(1):91-99. DOI:10.1016/j.critrevonc.2015.05.006 · 4.03 Impact Factor
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    • "Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk for different cancers, especially colorectal [58] and breast [59]. "
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    09/2014; 72(1):32. DOI:10.1186/2049-3258-72-32
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    • "Reduced serum levels of 25(OH)D have been reported correlated with several detrimental health effects [5] [6] [7] [8], including worst prognosis of some cancers [9] [10]. A meta-analysis of 35 independent case-control and cohort studies investigating the association of serum 25(OH)D levels with cancer showed a consistent inverse relationship between circulating 25(OH)D levels and colorectal cancer risk [11]; no similar conclusions could however be drawn for other cancer sites. "
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