Article

On-pump and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with left main stem disease: A propensity score analysis

Bristol Heart Institute, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery (Impact Factor: 3.99). 08/2011; 143(6):1382-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2011.07.035
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study compared safety and efficacy between off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB), a relatively new technique, and conventional on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CCAB) in patients with left main stem disease.
In a retrospective, observational, cohort study of prospectively collected data on 2375 consecutive patients with left main stem disease undergoing isolated CABG (1297 OPCAB, 1078 CCAB) between April 1996 and December 2009 at the Bristol Heart Institute, 548 patients undergoing OPCAB were matched with 548 patients undergoing CCAB by propensity score.
After propensity matching, groups were comparable in preoperative characteristics. Relative to CCAB, OPCAB was associated with lower in-hospital mortality (0.5% vs 2.9%; P = .001), incidence of stroke (0% vs 0.9%; P = .02), postoperative renal dysfunction (4.9% vs 10.8%; P = .001), pulmonary complications (10.2% vs 16.6%; P = .002), and infectious complications (3.5% vs 6.2%; P = .03). The OPCAB group received fewer grafts than did the CCAB group (2.7 ± 0.7 vs 3 ± 0.7; P = .001) and had a lower rate of complete revascularization (88.3% vs 92%; P = .04). In multivariable analysis, cardiopulmonary bypass was confirmed to be an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 5.74; P = .001). Survivals at 1, 5, and 10 years were similar between groups (OPCAB, 96.8%, 87.3%, and 71.7%; CCAB, 96.8%, 88.6%, and 69.8%).
OPCAB in patients with left main stem disease is a safe procedure with reduced early morbidity and mortality and similar long-term survival to conventional on-pump revascularization.

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