• NEW SOLUTIONS A Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health Policy 01/2011; 21(4):531-3. DOI:10.2190/NS.21.4.a
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    ABSTRACT: In the past decade, there has been growing evidence that activities to mitigate climate change can have beneficial impacts on public health as a result of changes to environmental pollutants and health-related behaviours. Urban settlements provide particular opportunities to help achieve reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and thus associated health benefits. Energy efficiency improvements in housing can help protect against the adverse health effects of low and high temperatures and outdoor air pollution; transport interventions, especially ones that entail increased walking and cycling, can help improve physical activity and the urban environment; and switching to low carbon fuels to generate electricity can reduce air pollution-related health burdens. However, interventions need to be carefully designed and implemented to maximize health benefits and minimize potential adverse health risks.
    Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 10/2012; 4(4):398–404. DOI:10.1016/j.cosust.2012.09.011 · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The future of global health depends far more on fundamental ecological and social determinants than on progress for health technologies, whether surgical, pharmacological or immunological. There is a growing gap between the optimism in official forecasts of development and global health and the trend of the most important health determinants. Without fundamental change to these, in turn requiring a global shift in culture and measurements of progress, the prospects for global health look bleak. “Peak health” in the past has generally referred to humans in their prime of fitness; in the future it may be seen to refer to the time when global life expectancy reached its maximum. That time may be within a decade – but, if we can change sufficient practices, then we might still improve global health through this century.
    World medical journal 01/2013; .(59):82-90.