Article

The effect of topical 0.05% cyclosporine on recurrence following pterygium surgery.

Haydarpaşa Numune Education and Research Hospital, Ophthalmology Clinic, Istanbul, Turkey;
Clinical Ophthalmology 01/2011; 5:881-5. DOI: 10.2147/OPTH.S19469
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To investigate the role of postoperative topical 0.05% cyclosporine A (CsA) eye drops (Restasis(®), Allergan Pharmaceutical) in the prevention of recurrence among patients with primary pterygium treated with bare-sclera technique.
In this prospective randomized controlled study, 36 eyes (34 patients) with primary pterygium were randomized into two groups: Group I comprised 18 eyes (18 patients), and Group II comprised 18 eyes (16 patients). Bare sclera technique was performed in both groups. In Group I, 0.05% CsA was administered postoperatively at 6-hour intervals for 6 months, and Group II did not receive any cyclosporine treatment. The patients were assessed for recurrence, side effects, and complications at postoperative 1 and 7 days as well as each month during the following year. Conjunctival advances which showed a limbus higher than 1 mm were recognized as recurrence.
Recurrence occurred in four patients (22.2%) in Group I and in eight (44.4%) patients in Group II.
Postoperative application of low-dose CsA can be effective for preventing recurrences after primary pterygium surgery.

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