Article

Role of polyamines in determining the cellular response to chemotherapeutic agents: modulation of protein kinase CK2 expression and activity.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense, Denmark.
Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry (Impact Factor: 2.39). 07/2011; 356(1-2):149-58. DOI: 10.1007/s11010-011-0949-4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Numerous studies have shown that platinum compounds stimulate the expression of the polyamine catabolic enzyme spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase resulting in anti-proliferative activity and apoptosis. As many cancer cell types including pancreatic cancer cells express high levels of polyamines, the possibility to develop anti-tumor strategies to deplete polyamine pools has drawn considerable attention in recent years. This has been effectively accomplished by treating cells with platinum drugs in combination with polyamine analogs such as N(1),N(11)-diethylnorspermine (DENSPM). The present study, examined the cytotoxic effects of oxaliplatin in combination with stimulators of polyamine catabolism in human pancreatic cancer cells, that are notoriously resistant to chemotherapeutic treatment, and colorectal cancer cells. Additionally, as protein kinase CK2 has been shown to be an anti-apoptotic and pro-survival enzyme regulated by the intracellular polyamine pools, we aimed to investigate the effect of combined DENSPM and oxaliplatin treatment on CK2-mRNA and -protein levels. Results reported here show that treatment with oxaliplatin and DENSPM in combination impairs cell viability particularly in the case of colorectal cancer cells. The analysis of CK2 expression and activity indicates that the response to a specific treatment may depend on the impact that individual compounds exert on pro-survival and pro-death proteins at the transcription and translation levels that should be carefully evaluated in view of subsequent clinical studies.

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May 22, 2014

Jan Kreutzer