Hepatorenal Correction in Murine Glycogen Storage Disease Type I With a Double-stranded Adeno-associated Virus Vector

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Medical Genetics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.
Molecular Therapy (Impact Factor: 6.23). 07/2011; 19(11):1961-70. DOI: 10.1038/mt.2011.126
Source: PubMed


Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Long-term complications of GSD-Ia include life-threatening hypoglycemia and proteinuria progressing to renal failure. A double-stranded (ds) adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector encoding human G6Pase was pseudotyped with four serotypes, AAV2, AAV7, AAV8, and AAV9, and we evaluated efficacy in 12-day-old G6pase (-/-) mice. Hypoglycemia during fasting (plasma glucose <100 mg/dl) was prevented for >6 months by the dsAAV2/7, dsAAV2/8, and dsAAV2/9 vectors. Prolonged fasting for 8 hours revealed normalization of blood glucose following dsAAV2/9 vector administration at the higher dose. The glycogen content of kidney was reduced by >65% with both the dsAAV2/7 and dsAAV2/9 vectors, and renal glycogen content was stably reduced between 7 and 12 months of age for the dsAAV2/9 vector-treated mice. Every vector-treated group had significantly reduced glycogen content in the liver, in comparison with untreated G6pase (-/-) mice. G6Pase was expressed in many renal epithelial cells of with the dsAAV2/9 vector for up to 12 months. Albuminuria and renal fibrosis were reduced by the dsAAV2/9 vector. Hepatorenal correction in G6pase (-/-) mice demonstrates the potential of AAV vectors for the correction of inherited diseases of metabolism.

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    ABSTRACT: Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is the inherited deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), primarily found in liver and kidney, which causes life-threatening hypoglycemia. Dogs with GSD-Ia were treated with double-stranded adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors encoding human G6Pase. Administration of an AAV9 pseudotyped (AAV2/9) vector to seven consecutive GSD-Ia neonates prevented hypoglycemia during fasting for up to 8 hr; however, efficacy eventually waned between 2 and 30 months of age, and readministration of a new pseudotype was eventually required to maintain control of hypoglycemia. Three of these dogs succumbed to acute hypoglycemia between 7 and 9 weeks of age; however, this demise could have been prevented by earlier readministration an AAV vector, as demonstrated by successful prevention of mortality of three dogs treated earlier in life. Over the course of this study, six out of nine dogs survived after readministration of an AAV vector. Of these, each dog required readministration on average every 9 months. However, two were not retreated until >34 months of age, while one with preexisting antibodies was re-treated three times in 10 months. Glycogen content was normalized in the liver following vector administration, and G6Pase activity was increased in the liver of vector-treated dogs in comparison with GSD-Ia dogs that received only with dietary treatment. G6Pase activity reached approximately 40% of normal in two female dogs following AAV2/9 vector administration. Elevated aspartate transaminase in absence of inflammation indicated that hepatocellular turnover in the liver might drive the loss of vector genomes. Survival was prolonged for up to 60 months in dogs treated by readministration, and all dogs treated by readministration continue to thrive despite the demonstrated risk for recurrent hypoglycemia and mortality from waning efficacy of the AAV2/9 vector. These preclinical data support the further translation of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy in GSD-Ia.
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