Article

Adapting treatment to patient problems.

Editorial accepted for publication April 2011.
American Journal of Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 14.72). 07/2011; 168(7):670-1. DOI: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2011.11040594
Source: PubMed
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