Article

NEMO is a key component of NF-κB- and IRF-3-dependent TLR3-mediated immunity to herpes simplex virus.

St Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Rockefeller Branch, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY10065, USA.
The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology (Impact Factor: 12.05). 06/2011; 128(3):610-7.e1-4. DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2011.04.059
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Children with germline mutations in Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), UNC93B1, TNF receptor-associated factor 3, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 are prone to herpes simplex virus-1 encephalitis, owing to impaired TLR3-triggered, UNC-93B-dependent, IFN-α/β, and/or IFN-λ-mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-dependent immunity.
We explore here the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of herpes simplex encephalitis in a child with a hypomorphic mutation in nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) essential modulator, which encodes the regulatory subunit of the inhibitor of the Iκβ kinase complex.
The TLR3 signaling pathway was investigated in the patient's fibroblasts by analyses of IFN-β, IFN-λ, and IL-6 mRNA and protein levels, by quantitative PCR and ELISA, respectively, upon TLR3 stimulation (TLR3 agonists or TLR3-dependent viruses). NF-κB activation was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and interferon regulatory factor 3 dimerization on native gels after stimulation with a TLR3 agonist.
The patient's fibroblasts displayed impaired responses to TLR3 stimulation in terms of IFN-β, IFN-λ, and IL-6 production, owing to impaired activation of both NF-κB and IRF-3. Moreover, vesicular stomatitis virus, a potent IFN-inducer in human fibroblasts, and herpes simplex virus-1, induced only low levels of IFN-β and IFN-λ in the patient's fibroblasts, resulting in enhanced viral replication and cell death, as reported for UNC-93B-deficient fibroblasts.
Herpes simplex encephalitis may occur in patients carrying NF-κB essential modulator mutations, due to the impairment of NF-κB- and interferon regulatory factor 3-dependent-TLR3-mediated antiviral IFN production.

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