Article

Measuring and predicting eyelid spectral transmittance

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Lighting Research Center, 21 Union Street, Troy, New York 12180, USA.
Journal of Biomedical Optics (Impact Factor: 2.75). 06/2011; 16(6):067011. DOI: 10.1117/1.3593151
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The purpose of the present study was to objectively quantify the spectral transmittance of the eyelid. Reported here are data acquired using a technique that was developed to provide practical and accurate measurements of eyelid transmittance across the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The empirical data were analyzed in terms of the absorption and scattering characteristics of the constituents of skin to develop a method for predicting eyelid transmission. Results showed that the eyelid has a much higher optical density at short wavelengths than previously published. The mean ± standard deviation (s.d.) optical density of the eyelid from 450 to 650 nm was 2.1 ± 0.3 with an optical density range among subjects of approximately 1.0. The study results indicate that skin pigmentation is poorly correlated with eyelid transmission; eyelid transmission is most affected by wavelength-independent macromolecules in the eyelid as well as its overall thickness.

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