Article

Impact of high-fat diet and obesity on energy balance and fuel utilization during the metabolic challenge of lactation.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Basic Reproductive Sciences, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, USA.
Obesity (Impact Factor: 3.92). 06/2011; 20(1):65-75. DOI:10.1038/oby.2011.196
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The effects of obesity and a high-fat (HF) diet on whole body and tissue-specific metabolism of lactating dams and their offspring were examined in C57/B6 mice. Female mice were fed low-fat (LF) or HF diets before and throughout pregnancy and lactation. HF-fed mice were segregated into lean (HF-Ln) and obese (HF-Ob) groups before pregnancy by their weight gain response. Compared to LF-Ln dams, HF-Ln, and HF-Ob dams exhibited a greater positive energy balance (EB) and increased dietary fat retention in peripheral tissues (P < 0.05). HF-Ob dams had greater dietary fat retention in liver and adipose compared to HF-Ln dams (P < 0.05). De novo synthesized fat was decreased in tissues and milk from HF-fed dams compared to LF-Ln dams (P < 0.05). However, less dietary and de novo synthesized fat was found in the HF-Ob mammary glands compared to HF-Ln (P < 0.05). Obesity was associated with reduced milk triglycerides relative to lean controls (P < 0.05). Compared to HF diet alone obesity has additional adverse affects, impairing both lipid metabolism as well as milk fat production. Growth rates of LF-Ln litters were lower than HF-Ln and HF-Ob litters (P < 0.05). Total energy expenditure (TEE) of HF-Ob litters was reduced relative to HF-Ln litters, whereas their respiratory exchange ratios (RERs) were increased (P < 0.05). Collectively these data show that consumption of a HF diet significantly affects maternal and neonatal metabolism and that maternal obesity can independently alter these responses.

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