Article

Neonatal resuscitation for the preterm infant: evidence versus practice.

Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego Medical Center and School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92103-8774, USA.
Journal of perinatology: official journal of the California Perinatal Association (Impact Factor: 2.35). 10/2010; 30 Suppl:S57-66. DOI: 10.1038/jp.2010.115
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In an effort to determine the actual conduct of neonatal resuscitation and the errors that may be occurring during this process, we developed a method of video recording neonatal resuscitations as an ongoing quality assurance project. We initiated video recordings of resuscitations using simple video recorders attached to an overhead warmer and reviewed the resultant tapes during biweekly quality improvement meetings. We also added the continuous recording of analog information such as heart rate, oximeter values, fraction of inspired oxygen and airway pressure. We subsequently developed a checklist that includes a preresuscitation briefing and a postresuscitation debriefing, all of which are reviewed at the same time as the video recording. We have examined the use of oxygen in the very preterm infant, the effectiveness of bag and mask ventilation, including the detection of airway obstruction during such ventilation, intubation in the delivery area and environment. In addition, we have trained our teams and leaders using Crew Resource Management and focused on improved communication. The availability of a dedicated room for resuscitation allows an increased ambient environment and the ability to provide a user-friendly setting similar to the neonatal intensive care unit to optimize performance. There are numerous opportunities for improving team and leader performance and outcomes following neonatal resuscitation. Further prospective studies are required to evaluate specific interventions.

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    ABSTRACT: An extreme attentiveness is mandatory when caring about extremely-low-gestational-age neonates at birth because of their innate vulnerability. The interventions performed during resuscitation of these infants may have direct influence on the immediate survival and also on long-term morbidity. Although stressfull, each resuscitation step is crucial and needs to be precise, fast and harmless. In order to determine our compliance to the international guidelines and to assess our neonatal performances in delivery room, we used a Mobotix camera to record all resuscitations of extremely-low-gestational-age neonates during the decisive first minutes of life. Neonatal medical and nursing staff agreed to be recorded. Our local ethics committee approved that videotaping neonatal resuscitation is an audit of clinical practice and thus does not require informed consent. During debriefing sessions, we reviewed the videotaped recordings, which allowed us to identify frequent deviations from the international guidelines and to re-educate and improve performance. The most frequent errors we recognized were errors of hygiene, not re-evaluating oxygen titration and airway obstruction during mask ventilation. We observed team behaviour and coordination during resuscitation and focused on quality of care. We believe that this method may be very effective as a teaching tool.
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