Article

Cutaneous malignant melanoma: ESMO Clinical Recommendations for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up

Department of Dermatology, University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
Annals of Oncology (Impact Factor: 6.58). 05/2009; 20 Suppl 4:129-31. DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdp152
Source: PubMed
Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: George Pentheroudakis, Aug 26, 2014
0 Followers
 · 
68 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Population-based cancer registry studies of care patterns can help elucidate reasons for the marked geographic variation in cancer survival across Italy. The article provides a snapshot of the care delivered to cancer patients in Italy. METHODS: Random samples of adult patients with skin melanoma, breast, colon and non-small cell lung cancers diagnosed in 2003-2005 were selected from 14 Italian cancer registries. Logistic models estimated odds of receiving standard care (conservative surgery plus radiotherapy for early breast cancer; surgery plus chemotherapy for Dukes C colon cancer; surgery for lung cancer; sentinel node biopsy for >1mm melanoma, vs. other treatment) in each registry compared to the entire sample (reference). RESULTS: Stage at diagnosis for breast, colon and melanoma was earlier in north/central than southern registries. Odds of receiving standard care were lower than reference in Sassari (0.68, 95%CI 0.51-0.90) and Napoli (0.48, 95%CI 0.35-0.67) for breast cancer; did not differ across registries for Dukes C colon cancer; were higher in Romagna (3.77, 95%CI 1.67-8.50) and lower in Biella (0.38, 95%CI 0.18-0.82) for lung cancer; and were higher in Reggio Emilia (2.37, 95%CI 1.12-5.02) and lower in Ragusa (0.27, 95%CI 0.14-0.54) for melanoma. CONCLUSIONS: Notwithstanding limitations due to variations in the availability of clinical information and differences in stage distribution between north/central and southern registries, our study shows that important disparities in cancer care persist across Italy. Thus the public health priority of reducing cancer survival disparities will not be achieved in the immediate future.
    07/2012; 36(6). DOI:10.1016/j.canep.2012.06.006
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Knowledge of the lymphatic system plays critical importance in surgical oncology. The study of the lymphatic system and its role in tumor metastasis continues to advance with new anatomical and surgical studies, and with a new study, we can gain a better understanding on how aggressive surgeons need to be with nodal dissection while balancing the complications with overly aggressive approaches. The lymphatics of the inguinal region represent a network of lymph nodes and vessels, which act as the bridge among the lower extremities, pelvis, perineum, and rest of the body. These lymph nodes are of particular importance in the metastatic spread of genitourinary and lower gastrointestinal epithelial cancer to the inguinal nodes. The aim of this article is to reveal the literature with regard to the inguinal lymph nodes and their relation in various carcinomas.
    The American surgeon 01/2015; 81(4). · 0.92 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Knowledge of the lymphatic system plays critical importance in surgical oncology. The study of the lymphatic system and its role in tumor metastasis continues to advance with new anatomical and surgical studies, and with a new study, we can gain a better understanding on how aggressive surgeons need to be with nodal dissection while balancing the complications with overly aggressive approaches. The lymphatics of the inguinal region represent a network of lymph nodes and vessels, which act as the bridge among the lower extremities, pelvis, perineum, and rest of the body. These lymph nodes are of particular importance in the metastatic spread of genitourinary and lower gastrointestinal epithelial cancer to the inguinal nodes. The aim of this article is to reveal the literature with regard to the inguinal lymph nodes and their relation in various carcinomas.
    The American surgeon 04/2015; 81(4):365-9. · 0.92 Impact Factor