Article

Intra-arterial milrinone for reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome.

Department of Neurological Sciences, CHA (Enfant-Jésus), Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, Canada.
Headache The Journal of Head and Face Pain (Impact Factor: 2.94). 01/2009; 49(1):142-5. DOI: 10.1111/j.1526-4610.2008.01211.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) usually presents with recurrent thunderclap headaches and is characterized by multifocal and reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries that can sometimes evolve to severe cerebral ischemia and stroke. We describe the case of a patient who presented with a clinically typical RCVS and developed focal neurological symptoms and signs despite oral treatment with calcium channel blockers. Within hours of neurological deterioration, she was treated with intra-arterial milrinone, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, which resulted in a rapid and sustained neurological improvement.

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