Article

Incidence and remission of lower urinary tract symptoms during 12 years after the first delivery: A cohort study

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Glostrup County Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
The Journal of urology (Impact Factor: 3.75). 09/2008; 180(3):992-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.juro.2008.05.027
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We estimated the incidence and remission of lower urinary tract symptoms during the 12 years following the first pregnancy and delivery.
In a cohort study 242 primiparae were questioned about lower urinary tract symptoms 3 months, 5 years and 12 years after the first delivery.
From 3 months to 5 years after first delivery the incidence of stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence, urgency, diurnal frequency and nocturia was 56 of 213 cases (26.3%), 33 of 219 (15.1%), 33 of 206 (16.0%), 49 of 219 (22.4%) and 6 of 225 (2.7%), respectively. Remission of stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence, urgency, diurnal frequency and nocturia during the same period occurred in 1 of 11 cases (9.1%), 2 of 5 (40%), 2 of 5 (40%), 4 of 7 (57.1%) and 1 of 1 (100%), respectively. From 5 to 12 years after the first delivery the incidence of stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence, urgency, diurnal frequency and nocturia was 40 of 158 cases (25.3%), 25 of 188 (13.3%), 24 of 175 (13.7%), 40 of 174 (23.0%) and 13 of 220 (5.9%), respectively. Remission of stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence, urgency, diurnal frequency and nocturia during the same period occurred in 14 of 66 cases (21.2%), 13 of 36 (36.1%), 22 of 36 (61.1%), 14 of 52 (26.9%) and 4 of 6 (66.7%), respectively. Of 62 women with pure stress urinary incontinence during the first pregnancy and puerperium 20 (32.2%) had pure stress urinary incontinence, 3 (4.8%) had pure urge urinary incontinence and 15 (24.2%) had mixed urinary incontinence 12 years later. Of 13 women with pure urge urinary incontinence during the first pregnancy and puerperium 3 (23.1%) had pure urge urinary incontinence, 2 (15.4%) had pure stress urinary incontinence and 3 (23.1%) had mixed urinary incontinence 12 years later. The overall prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms 12 years after the first delivery increased significantly.
The incidence and remission of lower urinary tract symptoms after the first pregnancy and delivery fluctuate and the types of urinary incontinence may interchange, while the overall prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms increases in the long term.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
65 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To examine whether reproductive history and related conditions are associated with the development and persistence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) other than urinary incontinence in a racially and/or ethnically diverse population-based sample of women. Materials and Methods The Boston Area Community Health Survey enrolled 3201 women aged 30-79 years of black, Hispanic, or white race and/or ethnicity. Baseline and 5-year follow-up interviews were completed by 2534 women (conditional response rate, 83.4%). The association between reproductive history factors and population-weighted estimates of LUTS progression and persistence was tested using multivariable logistic regression models. Results Between baseline and 5-year follow-up, 23.9% women had LUTS progression. In age-adjusted models, women who had delivered ≥2 childbirths had higher odds of LUTS progression, but the association was completely accounted for by vaginal child delivery (eg, 2 vaginal childbirths vs none, multivariable-adjusted odds ratio = 2.21; 95% CI, 1.46-3.35; P <.001). No increased odds of LUTS progression were found for women with only 1 vaginal delivery or who only had cesarean section(s). Uterine prolapse was associated with higher odds of LUTS progression (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio = 3.05; 95% CI, 1.43-6.50; P = .004). Gestational diabetes was associated with approximately twice the odds of LUTS progression, but only among younger women (interaction P = .003). Conclusion In this cohort study, ≥2 vaginal child deliveries, uterine prolapse, and among younger women, gestational diabetes were robust predictors of LUTS progression. Clinicians should assess the presence of bothersome urinary frequency, urgency, and voiding symptoms among women who have had multiple vaginal childbirths or gestational diabetes.
    Urology 04/2014; 83(4). DOI:10.1016/j.urology.2013.12.016 · 2.13 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To examine the association between vaginal or cesarean delivery and urinary incontinence (UI) and identify the trend in the change in UI within the first 12 months postpartum. This was a prospective longitudinal study of 330 of 749 women who completed a UI questionnaire and a personal characteristics questionnaire over five visits in a medical center. The vaginal delivery group had a significant higher prevalence of any UI at 4-6 weeks and at 3, 6, and 12 months (29.1-40.2% vaginal compared with 14.2-25.5% cesarean); stress urinary incontinence (SUI) at 4-6 weeks and 3 and 12 months (15.9-25.4% vaginal compared with 6.4-15.6% cesarean); and moderate or severe UI at 3-5 days, 4-6 weeks, and 6 months (7.9-18.5% vaginal compared with 4.3-11.3% cesarean); and a significant higher score for interference in daily life at 3-5 days and 4-6 weeks (1.0, 0.7 vaginal compared with 0.7, 0.4 cesarean) compared with those in the cesarean delivery group. Prevalence increased for any UI, SUI, and slight UI (all P<.02) and daily life interference score decreased (P=.02) for women who had a vaginal delivery through 1 year postpartum. Vaginal delivery was associated with higher UI prevalence that persisted for 1 year postpartum, but there was no association with interference in daily life after 6 weeks postpartum. Variation was observed in UI changes within the first year in the vaginal delivery and cesarean delivery groups. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:: II.
    Obstetrics and Gynecology 02/2014; DOI:10.1097/AOG.0000000000000141 · 4.37 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To explain variation in female age specific incidence rates for urinary incontinence (UI) from published population based studies. An extensive Medline review of publications on population based studies of female UI incidence rates from 1966 to 2011 was completed using a combination of symptom and epidemiological search terms. Eighteen reports described 17 unique incidence studies. Features (e.g. sample size, follow-up period, etc) of each study were abstracted along with detailed data on 109 age specific incidence rates (i.e., new cases/1,000 person-years). Because one study had unique demographics and was dominant in sample size (i.e., NHS), analyses were completed with and without this study. Weighted (i.e., square root of sample size) linear regression was used to determine factors (i.e., age, source population, race, frequency score, etc.) explaining variance among age specific incidence rates. Age and case definition accounted for 60% of variation in incidence rates among studies. Age specific incidence was below 2/1000 person-years before age 40 and increased thereafter. For a given age group, incidence rates varied as much as six-fold across studies, a finding that was largely explained by variation in case definition. The case definition accounts for substantial variation in UI incidence estimates. Developing standards for reporting will provide a foundation to policy guidance and understanding etiology. We recommend that quantitative frequency criteria (e.g., 2 times or more/month) be reported versus vague thresholds (e.g., sometimes or often).
    The Journal of urology 10/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.juro.2013.10.050 · 3.75 Impact Factor