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Better cognitive performance in elderly taking antioxidant vitamins E and C supplements in combination with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: the Cache County Study.

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Center for Memory and Brain Health, LifeBridge Health Brain & Spine Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA.
Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association (Impact Factor: 17.47). 05/2008; 4(3):223-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.jalz.2008.01.004
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Studies have shown less cognitive decline and lower risk of Alzheimer's disease in elderly individuals consuming either antioxidant vitamins or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The potential of added benefit from their combined use has not been studied. We therefore analyzed data from 3,376 elderly participants of the Cache County Study who were given the Modified Mini-Mental State examination up to three times during a period of 8 years. Those who used a combination of vitamins E and C supplements and NSAIDs at baseline declined by an average 0.96 fewer points every 3 years than nonusers (P < .05). This apparent effect was attributable entirely to participants with the APOE epsilon4 allele, whose users declined by 2.25 fewer points than nonusers every 3 years (P < .05). These results suggest that among elderly individuals with an APOE epsilon4 allele, there is an association between using antioxidant supplements in combination with NSAIDs and less cognitive decline over time.

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