Article

The carboxy terminus of NBS1 is required for induction of apoptosis by the MRE11 complex.

Molecular Biology and Genetics, Sloan-Kettering Institute, New York, New York 10021, USA.
Nature (Impact Factor: 42.35). 05/2007; 447(7141):218-21. DOI: 10.1038/nature05740
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The MRE11 complex (MRE11, RAD50 and NBS1) and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase function in the same DNA damage response pathway to effect cell cycle checkpoint activation and apoptosis. The functional interaction between the MRE11 complex and ATM has been proposed to require a conserved C-terminal domain of NBS1 for recruitment of ATM to sites of DNA damage. Human Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) cells and those derived from multiple mouse models of NBS express a hypomorphic NBS1 allele that exhibits impaired ATM activity despite having an intact C-terminal domain. This indicates that the NBS1 C terminus is not sufficient for ATM function. We derived Nbs1(DeltaC/DeltaC) mice in which the C-terminal ATM interaction domain is deleted. Nbs1(DeltaC/DeltaC) cells exhibit intra-S-phase checkpoint defects, but are otherwise indistinguishable from wild-type cells with respect to other checkpoint functions, ionizing radiation sensitivity and chromosome stability. However, multiple tissues of Nbs1(DeltaC/DeltaC) mice showed a severe apoptotic defect, comparable to that of ATM- or CHK2-deficient animals. Analysis of p53 transcriptional targets and ATM substrates showed that, in contrast to the phenotype of Chk2(-/-) mice, NBS1(DeltaC) does not impair the induction of proapoptotic genes. Instead, the defects observed in Nbs1(DeltaC/DeltaC) result from impaired phosphorylation of ATM targets including SMC1 and the proapoptotic factor, BID.

0 Followers
 · 
99 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nibrin (also named NBN or NBS1) is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBN complex, which is involved in early steps of DNA double strand breaks sensing and repair. Mutations within the NBN gene are responsible for the Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS). The 90% of NBS patients are homozygous for the 657del5 mutation, which determines the synthesis of two truncated proteins of 26 kDa (p26) and 70 kDa (p70). Here, HEK293 cells have been exploited to transiently express either the full-length NBN protein or the p26 or p70 fragments, followed by affinity chromatography enrichment of the eluates. The application of an unsupervised proteomics approach, based upon SDS-PAGE separation and shotgun digestion of protein bands followed by MS/MS protein identification, indicates the occurrence of previously unreported protein interacting partners of the full-length NBN protein and the p26 fragment containing the FHA/BRCT1 domains, especially after cell irradiation. In particular, results obtained shed light on new possible roles of NBN and of the p26 fragment in ROS scavenging, in the DNA damage response, and in protein folding and degradation. In particular, here we show that p26 interacts with PARP1 after irradiation, and this interaction exerts an inhibitory effect on PARP1 activity as measured by NAD+ levels. Furthermore, the p26-PARP1 interaction seems to be responsible for the persistence of ROS, and in turn of DSBs, at 24 h from IR. Since some of the newly identified interactors of the p26 and p70 fragments have not been found to interact with the full-length NBN, these interactions may somehow contribute to the key biological phenomena underpinning NBS.
    PLoS ONE 12/2014; 9(12):e114651. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0114651 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Newly identified interactions with the FHA and BRCT domains of NBS1 influence subcellular localization of the MRE11 complex.•The MRE11 complex promotes TOPBP1 recruitment and ATR activation during replication stress.•The MRE11 complex is a barrier to oncogene-induced tumorigenesis.
    Experimental Cell Research 10/2014; 329(1). DOI:10.1016/j.yexcr.2014.10.010 · 3.37 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mps one binder proteins (MOBs) are conserved regulators of essential signalling pathways. Biochemically, human MOB2 (hMOB2) can inhibit NDR kinases by competing with hMOB1 for binding to NDRs. However, biological roles of hMOB2 have remained enigmatic. Here, we describe novel functions of hMOB2 in the DNA damage response (DDR) and cell cycle regulation. hMOB2 promotes DDR signalling, cell survival and cell cycle arrest after exogenously induced DNA damage. Under normal growth conditions in the absence of exogenously induced DNA damage hMOB2 plays a role in preventing the accumulation of endogenous DNA damage and a subsequent p53/p21-dependent G1/S cell cycle arrest. Unexpectedly, these molecular and cellular phenotypes are not observed upon NDR manipulations, indicating that hMOB2 performs these functions independent of NDR signalling. Thus, to gain mechanistic insight, we screened for novel binding partners of hMOB2, revealing that hMOB2 interacts with RAD50, facilitating the recruitment of the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) DNA damage sensor complex and activated ATM to DNA damaged chromatin. Taken together, we conclude that hMOB2 supports the DDR and cell cycle progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Cellular Signalling 11/2014; 27(2). DOI:10.1016/j.cellsig.2014.11.016 · 4.47 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
7 Downloads
Available from
Feb 17, 2015