Article

Is eka-mercury (element 112) a group 12 metal?

Institute of Fundamental Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North City, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand
Angewandte Chemie International Edition (Impact Factor: 11.34). 01/2007; 46(10):1663-6. DOI: 10.1002/anie.200604262
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  • Encyclopedia of Electrochemistry, 12/2007; , ISBN: 9783527610426