Article

Respiratory arrest in systemic lupus erythematosus due to phrenic nerve neuropathy.

Clinical Immunology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Rogaland Central Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.
Lupus (Impact Factor: 2.78). 01/2004; 13(10):817-9. DOI: 10.1191/0961203304lu1070cr
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Diaphragmatic weakness in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a controversial issue and is claimed to have a neuropathic, myopathic or unknown pathogenesis. In this patient a predominantly motor neuropathy with diaphragmatic paralysis due to axonal involvement of the phrenic nerve was discovered and successfully treated with immunosuppressive drugs.

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