Article

Contribution of KATP+ channels to coronary vasomotor tone regulation is enhanced in exercising swine with a recent myocardial infarction.

Experimental Cardiology, Thoraxcenter, Cardiovascular Research School COEUR, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. <>
AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology (Impact Factor: 4.01). 03/2005; 288(3):H1306-13. DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00631.2004
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Previous studies demonstrated a decreased flow reserve in the hypertrophied myocardium early after myocardial infarction (MI). Previously, we reported that exacerbation of hemodynamic abnormalities and neurohumoral activation during exercise caused slight impairment of myocardial O(2) supply in swine with a recent MI. We hypothesized that increased metabolic coronary vasodilation [via ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)(+)) channels and adenosine] may have partially compensated for the increased extravascular compressive forces and increased vasoconstrictor neurohormones, thereby preventing a more severe impairment of myocardial O(2) balance. Chronically instrumented swine were exercised on a treadmill up to 85% of maximum heart rate. Under resting conditions, adenosine receptor blockade [8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), 5 mg/kg i.v.] and K(ATP)(+) channel blockade (glibenclamide, 3 mg/kg i.v.) produced similar decreases in myocardial O(2) supply in normal and MI swine. However, while glibenclamide's effect waned in normal swine during exercise (P < 0.05), it was maintained in MI swine. 8-PT's effect was maintained during exercise and was not different between normal and MI swine. Finally, in normal swine combined treatment with 8-PT and glibenclamide produced a vasoconstrictor response that equaled the sum of the responses to blockade of the individual pathways. In contrast, in MI swine the vasoconstrictor response to 8-PT and glibenclamide was similar to that produced by glibenclamide alone. In conclusion, despite significant hemodynamic abnormalities in swine with a recent MI, myocardial O(2) supply and O(2) consumption in remodeled myocardium are still closely matched during exercise. This close matching is supported by increased K(ATP)(+) channel-mediated coronary vasodilation. Although the net vasodilator influence of adenosine was unchanged in remodeled myocardium, it became exclusively dependent on K(ATP)(+) channel opening.

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