Article

Body anthropometry and the risk of hip and wrist fractures in men: results from a prospective study.

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
Obesity research (Impact Factor: 4.95). 01/1998; 6(1):12-9. DOI: 10.1002/j.1550-8528.1998.tb00309.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Available epidemiological information on the associations between body anthropometry and the incidence of fractures in men is limited. We therefore prospectively investigated the association between body anthropometry and the incidence of hip and wrist fractures from low and moderate trauma among 43,053 men who were 40 years to 75 years of age in 1986 when they first enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. After 8 years of follow-up, 201 wrist fracture cases and 56 hip fracture cases were reported. Greater height was associated with significant elevations in both hip and wrist fractures, whereas nonsignificant inverse associations were observed with weight and body mass index. Men in the highest quintile of waist circumference had a relative risk (RR) of 2.57 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64 to 10.3) for hip fracture and 2.05 (95% CI 1.06 to 3.96) for wrist fracture when compared with men in the lowest quintile. Waist-to-hip ratio was also positively related to fracture incidence; comparing highest with lowest quintile, the RRs were 3.92 (95% CI 1.07 to 14.3) for hip fracture and 1.50 (95% CI 0.85 to 2.66) for wrist fracture. These anthropometric indicators, in particular waist-to-hip ratio, may be useful for the prediction of hip fracture in adult men.

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