Article

Lithium protects against oxidative stress-mediated cell death in α-synuclein-overexpressing in vitro and in vivo models of Parkinson's disease.

Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, California 94945, USA.
Journal of Neuroscience Research (Impact Factor: 2.97). 06/2011; 89(10):1666-75. DOI: 10.1002/jnr.22700
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Lithium has recently been suggested to have neuroprotective properties in relation to several neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we examined the potential cytoprotective effect of lithium in preventing oxidative stress-induced protein accumulation and neuronal cell death in the presence of increased α-synuclein levels in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, lithium administration was found to protect against cell death in a hydrogen peroxide-treated, stable α-synuclein-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-overexpressing dopaminergic N27 cell line. Lithium feeding (0.255% lithium chloride) of 9-month-old pan-neuronal α-synuclein transgenic mice over a 3-month period was also sufficient to prevent accumulation of oxidized/nitrated α-synuclein as a consequence of chronic paraquat/maneb administration in multiple brain regions, including the glomerular layer, mitral cells, and the granule cell layer of the olfactory bulb (OB), striatum, substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. Lithium not only prevented α-synuclein-mediated protein accumulation/aggregation in these brain regions but also protected neuronal cells including mitral cells and dopaminergic SNpc neurons against oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. These results suggest that lithium can prevent both α-synuclein accumulation and neurodegeneration in an animal model of PD, suggesting that this drug, already FDA-approved for use in bipolar disorder, may constitute a novel therapy for another human disease.

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