Article

Children, adolescents, obesity, and the media.

PEDIATRICS (Impact Factor: 5.3). 06/2011; 128(1):201-8. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-1066
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Obesity has become a worldwide public health problem. Considerable research has shown that the media contribute to the development of child and adolescent obesity, although the exact mechanism remains unclear. Screen time may displace more active pursuits, advertising of junk food and fast food increases children's requests for those particular foods and products, snacking increases while watching TV or movies, and late-night screen time may interfere with getting adequate amounts of sleep, which is a known risk factor for obesity. Sufficient evidence exists to warrant a ban on junk-food or fast-food advertising in children's TV programming. Pediatricians need to ask 2 questions about media use at every well-child or well-adolescent visit: (1) How much screen time is being spent per day? and (2) Is there a TV set or Internet connection in the child's bedroom?

0 Bookmarks
 · 
125 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study extended the ordered protection motivation framework to determine whether exposure and attention to antiobesity media content increases people's appraisals of threat and their ability to cope with it. It also assesses whether these cognitive processes, in turn, affected people's intention to abide by the practices recommended to prevent obesity. The results of a national online survey using a nonprobability sample indicate that attention to mediated obesity and related information significantly increased people's intention to exercise as well as their overall coping appraisals (the perceived effectiveness of the recommended behaviors and their ability to perform them). Likewise, increased threat and coping appraisals were both found to significantly influence people's intention to exercise and diet. Coping (rather than threat) appraisals more strongly predicted behavioral intent. Following the attitude-behavior literature, behavioral intention was used as the most proximate predictor of actual behavior (i.e., stronger intentions increase the likelihood of behavior change).
    Journal of obesity 01/2014; 2014:954784.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Green spaces have been associated with both health benefits and risks in children; however, available evidence simultaneously investigating these conflicting influences, especially in association with different types of greenness, is scarce. Objectives: To simultaneously evaluate health benefits and risks associated with different types of greenness in children, in terms of sedentary behavior (represented by excessive screen time), obesity, current asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of a population-based sample of 3,178 schoolchildren (9-12 years old) in Sabadell, Spain (2006). Information on outcomes and covariates was obtained by questionnaire. We measured residential surrounding greenness as the average of satellite-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in buffers of 100 m, 250 m, 500 m, and 1000 m around each home address. Residential proximity to green spaces was defined as living within 300 m of a forest or a park, as separate variables. We utilized logistic regression models to estimate associations separately for each exposure-outcome pair, adjusted for relevant covariates. Results: An inter-quartile range increase in residential surrounding greenness was associated with 11-19% lower relative prevalence of overweight/obesity and excessive screen time, but was not associated with current asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Similarly, residential proximity to forests was associated with 39% and 25% lower relative prevalence of excessive screen time and overweight/obesity, respectively, but was not associated with current asthma. In contrast, living close to parks was associated with a 60% higher relative prevalence of current asthma, but had only weak negative associations with obesity/overweight or excessive screen time. Conclusion: We observed two separable patterns of estimated health benefits and risks associated with different types of greenness.
    Environmental Health Perspectives 08/2014; · 7.03 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: TV and other screen use are common among elementary school aged children with both potential benefits and harms. It is not clear why some parents restrict their children's screen use and others do not. Parent's outcome expectations for allowing their child to watch TV and other screen media, i.e. the perceived 'costs' and 'benefits,' may be influential. Our objective was to develop a measure of Parent's Outcome Expectations for Children's TV Viewing (POETV) and test the psychometrics of the resulting instrument among parents with children 6-12 years old.
    BMC Public Health 08/2014; 14(1):894. · 2.32 Impact Factor

Full-text

Download
20 Downloads
Available from
May 30, 2014