Article

Antimicrobial susceptibility to azithromycin among Salmonella enterica isolates from the United States.

National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CCID/NCZVED/DFBMD/EDLB, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA.
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (Impact Factor: 4.57). 06/2011; 55(9):3985-9. DOI: 10.1128/AAC.00590-11
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Due to emerging resistance to traditional antimicrobial agents, such as ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol, azithromycin is increasingly used for the treatment of invasive Salmonella infections. In the present study, 696 isolates of non-Typhi Salmonella collected from humans, food animals, and retail meats in the United States were investigated for antimicrobial susceptibility to azithromycin. Seventy-two Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi isolates from humans were also tested. For each isolate, MICs of azithromycin and 15 other antimicrobial agents were determined by broth microdilution. Among the non-Typhi Salmonella isolates, azithromycin MICs among human isolates ranged from 1 to 32 μg/ml, whereas the MICs among the animal and retail meat isolates ranged from 2 to 16 μg/ml and 4 to 16 μg/ml, respectively. Among Salmonella serotype Typhi isolates, the azithromycin MICs ranged from 4 to 16 μg/ml. The highest MIC observed in the present study was 32 μg/ml, and it was detected in three human isolates belonging to serotypes Kentucky, Montevideo, and Paratyphi A. Based on our findings, we propose an epidemiological cutoff value (ECOFF) for wild-type Salmonella of ≤16 μg/ml of azithromycin. The susceptibility data provided could be used in combination with clinical outcome data to determine tentative clinical breakpoints for azithromycin and Salmonella enterica.

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