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Gender differences in firesetting: Results from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions (NESARC)

Service de psychiatrie, Hôpital Corentin Celton, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France.
Psychiatry Research (Impact Factor: 2.68). 06/2011; 190(2-3):352-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2011.05.045
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study presents gender differences in sociodemographics and in psychiatric correlates of firesetting in the United States. Data were derived from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a representative sample of U.S. adults. Face-to-face interviews of more than 43,000 adults were conducted in the 2001-2002 period. This study focused on the 407 subjects with a lifetime history of firesetting. The prevalence of lifetime firesetting in the U.S. was 1.7% in men and 0.4% in women. Firesetting was significantly associated with a wide range of antisocial behaviors that differed by gender. Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated associations in both genders with psychiatric and addictive disorders. Men with a lifetime history of firesetting were significantly more likely than men without such history to have lifetime generalized anxiety disorder as well as a diagnosis of conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder, alcohol or cannabis use disorder, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. Women with a lifetime history of firesetting were significantly more likely than women without such history to have lifetime alcohol or cannabis use disorder, conduct disorder, and antisocial or obsessive compulsive personality disorder, as well as psychotic disorder, bipolar disorder or schizoid personality disorder. Women with a lifetime history of firesetting were significantly more likely than men with such history to have a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol abuse and antisocial personality disorder as well as a diagnosis of schizoid personality disorder. Our findings indicate that firesetting in women could represent a behavioral manifestation of a broader spectrum than firesetting in men.

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    • "Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) were considered to be statistically significant if the associated confidence intervals did not cross the 1.0 threshold. We elected to estimate AORs as this is the common approach utilized with binary outcomes using the NESARC data (see Grant et al., 2004; Compton et al., 2007; Hoertel et al., 2011). However, it should be noted that, particularly with high-prevalence phenomena, odds ratios have been found to have several shortcomings, including the overestimation of risk associations (Zhang and Yu, 1998), For all statistical analyses, weighted prevalence estimates and standard errors were computed using Stata 13.1 SE software (StataCorp, 2013). "
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    • "Both men and women with a lifetime history of firesetting typically display also generalized anxiety disorder , conduct and antisocial personality disorder, alcohol or cannabis use disorder, and obsessive–compulsive personality disorder (Hoertel et al., 2011). Yet, pyromaniac women are significantly more likely than men to have a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol abuse and antisocial personality disorder as well as a diagnosis of schizoid personality disorder (Hoertel et al., 2011). Thus, although with a prevalence in male population, this disorder resemble at some extent compulsive shopping disorder which, as pyromania, was found to be associated with significant psychiatric comorbidity (especially mood and anxiety disorders), disorders of impulse control and substance use disorders (Christenson et al., 1994; Torresan et al., 2009). "
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    • "their counterparts to have numerous psychiatric disorders associated with impaired impulse control, consistent with previous findings. These results are in line with recent researches in alcohol and drug use disorders (Compton et al., 2007) and other antisocial behaviors (Hoertel et al., 2011, 2012), suggesting that shoplifting could be a behavioral manifestation of impaired impulse control and possibly a symptom of a relatively broader impaired impulse control syndrome with an underlying common factor (Blanco et al., 2008). Furthermore, several associations differ between sexes. "
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