Article

Gender differences in firesetting: Results from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions (NESARC)

Service de psychiatrie, Hôpital Corentin Celton, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France.
Psychiatry Research (Impact Factor: 2.68). 06/2011; 190(2-3):352-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2011.05.045
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study presents gender differences in sociodemographics and in psychiatric correlates of firesetting in the United States. Data were derived from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a representative sample of U.S. adults. Face-to-face interviews of more than 43,000 adults were conducted in the 2001-2002 period. This study focused on the 407 subjects with a lifetime history of firesetting. The prevalence of lifetime firesetting in the U.S. was 1.7% in men and 0.4% in women. Firesetting was significantly associated with a wide range of antisocial behaviors that differed by gender. Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated associations in both genders with psychiatric and addictive disorders. Men with a lifetime history of firesetting were significantly more likely than men without such history to have lifetime generalized anxiety disorder as well as a diagnosis of conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder, alcohol or cannabis use disorder, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. Women with a lifetime history of firesetting were significantly more likely than women without such history to have lifetime alcohol or cannabis use disorder, conduct disorder, and antisocial or obsessive compulsive personality disorder, as well as psychotic disorder, bipolar disorder or schizoid personality disorder. Women with a lifetime history of firesetting were significantly more likely than men with such history to have a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol abuse and antisocial personality disorder as well as a diagnosis of schizoid personality disorder. Our findings indicate that firesetting in women could represent a behavioral manifestation of a broader spectrum than firesetting in men.

Full-text

Available from: Nicolas Hoertel, Jan 29, 2014
4 Followers
 · 
233 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Little is known about mortality among firesetters. However, they hold many risk factors associated with elevated mortality. This study aimed to investigate mortality rates and patterns in the course of a 39-year follow-up of a consecutive sample (n=441) of pretrial male firesetters evaluated in a forensic psychiatric unit in Finland. For each firesetter, four controls matched for age, sex and place of birth were randomly selected from the Central Population Register. Mortality data was obtained from the Causes of Death statistics. By the end of the follow-up period, 48.0% of the firesetters and 22.0% of the controls had died (OR 2.47, 95% CI 2.00-3.05). Altogether, 24.1% of the firesetters and 17.6% of the control subjects had died of natural causes (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.16-1.92), whereas 20.9% and 3.8% respectively, died an unnatural death (OR 6.71, 95% CI 4.79-9.40). Alcohol-related deaths were more frequent among firesetters than controls. Our findings confirm that fire-setting behavior is associated with high mortality. More attention must be paid to the treatment of suicidality, psychiatric comorbidities and alcohol use disorders within this group both during and after their sentences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Psychiatry Research 12/2014; 225(3). DOI:10.1016/j.psychres.2014.11.032 · 2.68 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Limited literature suggests that there may be differences in how women and men experience borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms. The aim of the current study was to use methods based on item response theory (IRT) to examine whether, when equating for levels of BPD symptom severity, there are sex differences in the likelihood of reporting DSM-IV BPD symptoms. We conducted these analyses using a large, nationally representative sample from the USA (n = 34,653), the second wave of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Data from women and men were compared. There were statistically and clinically significant sex differences for 3 out of the 9 DSM-IV BPD symptoms. We found that women were more likely to experience suicidal/self-mutilation behavior, affective instability and chronic feelings of emptiness and tended to be less likely to endorse impulsivity at lower levels of borderline personality disorder severity than men, while affective instability and chronic feelings of emptiness appeared to be significantly less discriminant in terms of severity in men than in women. There were no significant differences between women and men on the remaining DSM-IV symptoms. Overall, our findings indicate substantial sex differences in borderline personality disorder symptom expression. Although our results may reflect sex-bias in diagnostic criteria, they are in keeping with recent arguments suggesting that BPD could be understood as a clinical phenomenon that may partially differ in men and women.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 09/2014; 59. DOI:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.08.019 · 4.09 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Deliberate self-harm (DSH) is associated with diverse psychiatric diagnoses and broad psychopathology but less is known about its association with other forms of interpersonal violence and crime. Using the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), the current study examined linkages between not only DSH and mental health and substance abuse comorbidity, but also childhood abuse, lifetime victimization, and a variety of violent behaviors. We identified a prevalence of 2.91% for DSH and found that DSH is associated with generalized and severe psychopathology, wide-ranging substance abuse, and adverse childhood experiences. Contrary to other studies, we found significant racial and ethnic differences in DSH. African-American, Latinos, and Asians, were substantially less likely than Whites to report DSH. Our hypothesis that DSH would be associated with a variety of violent behaviors including robbery, intimate partner violence, forced sex, cruelty to animals, and use of a weapon was supported even after adjusting for an array of covariates. We extend previous research on DSH by examining its prevalence in one the largest comorbidity surveys ever conducted and show that DSH is associated with multiple forms of violent behavior toward others, including animals.
    Psychiatry Research 12/2014; 225(3). DOI:10.1016/j.psychres.2014.11.041 · 2.68 Impact Factor