Article

Oseltamivir and Risk of Lower Respiratory Tract Complications in Patients With Flu Symptoms: A Meta-analysis of Eleven Randomized Clinical Trials

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
Clinical Infectious Diseases (Impact Factor: 9.42). 06/2011; 53(3):277-9. DOI: 10.1093/cid/cir400
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT An independent reanalysis of 11 randomized clinical trials shows that oseltamivir treatment reduces the risk of lower respiratory tract complications requiring antibiotic treatment by 28% overall (95% confidence interval [CI], 11%-42%) and by 37% among patients with confirmed influenza infections (95% CI, 18%-52%).

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