Article

The waits that matter.

Division of General Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, USA.
New England Journal of Medicine (Impact Factor: 54.42). 06/2011; 364(24):2279-81. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1101882
Source: PubMed
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