Article

Control of organelle size: the Golgi complex.

Department of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232, USA.
Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology (Impact Factor: 20.24). 05/2011; 27:57-77. DOI: 10.1146/annurev-cellbio-100109-104003
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The Golgi complex processes secretory proteins and lipids, carries out protein sorting and signaling, and supports growth and composition of the plasma membrane. Golgi complex size likely is regulated to meet the demands of each function, and this may involve differential changes of its distinct subdomains. Nevertheless, the primary size change is elongation of the Golgi ribbon-like network as occurs during Golgi complex doubling for mitosis and during differentiation involving upregulated secretion. One hypothesis states that Golgi complex size is set by the abundance of secretory cargo and Golgi complex components that, through binding vesicle coat complexes, drive vesicle coat formation to alter Golgi complex influx and efflux. Regulation of transport factors controlling Golgi membrane traffic is also observed and may control Golgi complex size, but more work is needed to directly link these events to Golgi complex size regulation, especially during differentiation of specialized cell types.

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