Article

Self-inflicted intracranial self-injury.

School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Journal of Emergencies Trauma and Shock 01/2011; 4(1):147. DOI: 10.4103/0974-2700.76814
Source: PubMed
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