Article

Paratumoral gene expression profiles: promising markers of malignancy in melanocytic lesions

From the Dept Histopathology, King's College Hospital and King's Health Partners, London, United Kingdom.
British Journal of Dermatology (Impact Factor: 4.1). 05/2011; 165(3):702-3. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2011.10437.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Gene expression analysis is becoming a useful tool for a better definition of neoplasms at diagnostic, prognostic and predictive levels. A method for gene expression analysis from the corneal layer overlying melanocytic lesions (paratumoral gene expression) offers promising results. The identification of these markers and the negative predictive value (100%) make this test an excellent way for the screening and selection of atypical melanocytic lesions to be biopsied. However, the nature and biological meaning of these markers still need further studies and clarifications: origin of the tested RNA, mechanism of RNA transference, utility for subclassification of melanocytic lesions.

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