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    ABSTRACT: A complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors is thought to be involved in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). A recent genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS) identified GRIN2A, which encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit involved in brain's excitatory neurotransmission, as a PD genetic modifier in inverse association with caffeine intake. Here in, we attempted to replicate the reported association of a single nucleotide polymorphism, GRIN2A_rs4998386, and its interaction with caffeine intake with PD in patient-control study in an ethnically homogenous population in southeastern Sweden, as consistent and independent genetic association studies are the gold standard for the validation of genome-wide association studies. All the subjects (193 sporadic PD patients and 377 controls) were genotyped, and the caffeine intake data was obtained by questionnaire. We observed an association between rs4998386 and PD with odds ratio (OR) of 0.61, 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 0.39-0.96, p = 0.03, under a model excluding rare TT allele. There was also a strong significance in joint effects of gene and caffeine on PD risk (TC heavy caffeine vs. CC light caffeine: OR = 0.38, 95%CI = [0.20-0.70], p = 0.002) and gene-caffeine interaction (OR = 0.998, 95%CI = [0.991-0.999], p<0.001). Overall, our results are in support of the findings of the GWAIS and provided additional evidence indicating PD protective effects of coffee drinking/caffeine intake as well as the interaction with glutamate receptor genotypes.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(6):e99294. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gene finding is a finite exercise, and a means to an end, rather than an end in itself. The field of human genetics should increasingly shift its attention from disease gene identification to following through on next steps, most importantly pursuing the biological mechanisms underlying genotype-phenotype associations.
    Genome Medicine 01/2014; 6(10):86. · 4.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An osteoarthritis (OA) susceptibility locus has been mapped to chromosome 3p21, to a region of high linkage disequilibrium encompassing twelve genes. Six of these genes are expressed in joint tissues and we therefore assessed whether any of the six were subject to cis-acting regulatory polymorphisms active in these tissues and which could therefore account for the association signal.
    BMC Medical Genetics 05/2014; 15(1):53. · 2.54 Impact Factor

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May 21, 2014