Article

Inoculation of Ni-resistant plant growth promoting bacterium Psychrobacter sp. strain SRS8 for the improvement of nickel phytoextraction by energy crops

Centre for Functional Ecology, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
International Journal of Phytoremediation (Impact Factor: 1.74). 02/2011; 13(2):126-39. DOI: 10.1080/15226511003671403
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study was conducted to elucidate effects of inoculating plant growth-promoting bacterium Psychrobacter sp. SRS8 on the growth and phytoextraction potential of energy crops Ricinus communis and Helianthus annuus in artificially Ni contaminated soils. The toxicity symptom in plants under Ni stress expressed as chlorophyll, protein content, growth inhibition, and Fe, P concentrations were studied, and the possible relationship among them were also discussed. The PGPB SRS8 was found capable of stimulating plant growth and Ni accumulation in both plant species. Further, the stimulation effect on plant biomass, chlorophyll, and protein content was concomitant with increased Fe and P assimilation from soil to plants. Further, the induction of catalase and peroxidase activities was also involved in the ability of SRS8 to increase the tolerance in both plant species under Ni stress. The findings suggest that strain SRS8 play an important role in promoting the growth and phytoextraction efficiency of R. communis and H. annuus, which may be used for remediation of metal contaminated sites.

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    • "In a similar manner, Martins et al. (2011) also observed a variation in GR activity according to treatment in their work with Enterobacter sp. when exposed to the herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor, when two distinct GR isoenzymes were induced specifically by the metolachlor herbicide, suggesting that GR takes part in herbicide tolerance. Further studies on the regulation of GR would significantly help to understand how important it is and its involvement in stress response in bacteria whatever the type of the xenobiotic used. "
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    • "In a similar manner, Martins et al. (2011) also observed a variation in GR activity according to treatment in their work with Enterobacter sp. when exposed to the herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor, when two distinct GR isoenzymes were induced specifically by the metolachlor herbicide, suggesting that GR takes part in herbicide tolerance. Further studies on the regulation of GR would significantly help to understand how important it is and its involvement in stress response in bacteria whatever the type of the xenobiotic used. "
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