Association of PPP2CA Polymorphisms With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Susceptibility in Multiple Ethnic Groups

David Geffen School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1670, USA.
Arthritis & Rheumatology (Impact Factor: 7.76). 05/2011; 63(9):2755-63. DOI: 10.1002/art.30452
Source: PubMed


T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) express increased amounts of PP2Ac, which contributes to decreased production of interleukin-2 (IL-2). Because IL-2 is important in the regulation of several aspects of the immune response, it has been proposed that PP2Ac contributes to the expression of SLE. This study was designed to determine whether genetic variants of PPP2AC are linked to the expression of SLE and specific clinical manifestations and account for the increased expression of PP2Ac.
We conducted a trans-ethnic study of 8,695 SLE cases and 7,308 controls of 4 different ancestries. Eighteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across PPP2CA were genotyped using an Illumina custom array. PPP2CA expression in SLE and control T cells was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction.
A 32-kb haplotype comprising multiple SNPs of PPP2CA showed significant association with SLE in Hispanic Americans, European Americans, and Asians, but not in African Americans. Conditional analyses revealed that SNP rs7704116 in intron 1 showed consistently strong association with SLE across Asian, European American, and Hispanic American populations (odds ratio 1.3 [95% confidence interval 1.14-1.31], meta-analysis P=3.8×10(-7)). In European Americans, the largest ethnic data set studied, the risk A allele of rs7704116 was associated with the presence of renal disease, anti-double-stranded DNA, and anti-RNP antibodies. PPP2CA expression was ∼2-fold higher in SLE patients carrying the rs7704116 AG genotype than those carrying the GG genotype (P=0.007).
Our data provide the first evidence of an association between PPP2CA polymorphisms and elevated PP2Ac transcript levels in T cells, which implicates a new molecular pathway for SLE susceptibility in European Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asians.

Download full-text


Available from: Juan-Manuel Anaya, Oct 07, 2015
1 Follower
24 Reads
  • Source
    • "IL21 [48] 4 123.75 PPP2CA [49] 5 133.53 TNIP1 [22] [28] [32] "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The reasons for the ethnic disparities in the prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the relative high frequency of SLE risk alleles in the population are not fully understood. Population genetic factors such as natural selection alter allele frequencies over generations and may help explain the persistence of such common risk variants in the population and the differential risk of SLE. In order to better understand the genetic basis of SLE that might be due to natural selection, a total of 74 genomic regions with compelling evidence for association with SLE were tested for evidence of recent positive selection in the HapMap and HGDP populations, using population differentiation, allele frequency, and haplotype-based tests. Consistent signs of positive selection across different studies and statistical methods were observed at several SLE-associated loci, including PTPN22, TNFSF4, TET3-DGUOK, TNIP1, UHRF1BP1, BLK, and ITGAM genes. This study is the first to evaluate and report that several SLE-associated regions show signs of positive natural selection. These results provide corroborating evidence in support of recent positive selection as one mechanism underlying the elevated population frequency of SLE risk loci and supports future research that integrates signals of natural selection to help identify functional SLE risk alleles.
    01/2014; 2014(6710):203435. DOI:10.1155/2014/203435
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, is a debilitating multisystem autoimmune disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and extensive immune dysregulation in multiple organ systems, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Here, we present a multidisciplinary approach resulting in the identification of neutrophil cytosolic factor 2 (NCF2) as an important risk factor for SLE and the detailed characterization of its causal variant. We show that NCF2 is strongly associated with increased SLE risk in two independent populations: childhood-onset SLE and adult-onset SLE. The association between NCF2 and SLE can be attributed to a single nonsynonymous coding mutation in exon 12, the effect of which is the substitution of histidine-389 with glutamine (H389Q) in the PB1 domain of the NCF2 protein, with glutamine being the risk allele. Computational modeling suggests that the NCF2 H389Q mutation reduces the binding efficiency of NCF2 with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav1. The model predicts that NCF2/H389 residue interacts with Vav1 residues E509, N510, E556, and G559 in the ZF domain of Vav1. Furthermore, replacing H389 with Q results in 1.5 kcal/mol weaker binding. To examine the effect of the NCF2 H389Q mutation on NADPH oxidase function, site-specific mutations at the 389 position in NCF2 were tested. Results show that an H389Q mutation causes a twofold decrease in reactive oxygen species production induced by the activation of the Vav-dependent Fcγ receptor-elicited NADPH oxidase activity. Our study completes the chain of evidence from genetic association to specific molecular function.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 12/2011; 109(2):E59-67. DOI:10.1073/pnas.1113251108 · 9.67 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The contribution of individual molecular aberrations to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease that affects multiple organs, is often difficult to evaluate because of the presence of abundant confounding factors. To assess the effect of increased expression of the phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in T cells, as recorded in SLE patients, we generated a transgenic mouse that overexpresses the PP2Ac subunit in T cells. The transgenic mouse displays a heightened susceptibility to immune-mediated glomerulonephritis in the absence of other immune defects. CD4(+) T cells produce increased amounts of IL-17 while the number of neutrophils in the peripheral blood is increased. IL-17 neutralization abrogated the development of glomerulonephritis. We conclude that increased PP2Ac expression participates in SLE pathogenesis by promoting inflammation through unchecked IL-17 production and facilitating the development of end-organ damage.
    The Journal of Immunology 03/2012; 188(8):3567-71. DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.1200143 · 4.92 Impact Factor
Show more