Pharmacokinetic profile in late pregnancy and cord blood concentration of tipranavir and enfuvirtide

Department of Obstetrics, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.
International Journal of STD & AIDS (Impact Factor: 1.05). 05/2011; 22(5):294-5. DOI: 10.1258/ijsa.2009.009166
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The data on the use of tipranavir and enfuvirtide in pregnancy are very limited. We performed a pharmacokinetic profile in a pregnant woman with multidrug-resistant HIV-1 infection at 37 weeks gestation. Tipranavir levels were in the therapeutic range and the cord blood concentration at delivery was relatively high when compared with other protease inhibitors. No enfuvirtide was detected in the fetal compartment. Tipranavir and enfuvirtide were successfully used in pregnancy, but possible toxicities must be kept in mind.

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