Article

Clinical study on treatment of the earthquake-caused post-traumatic stress disorder by cognitive-behavior therapy and acupoint stimulation.

Zhejiang Provincial Tongde Hospital, Hangzhou 310012, China.
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Impact Factor: 0.67). 03/2011; 31(1):60-3. DOI: 10.1016/S0254-6272(11)60014-9
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To study the curative effect of acupoint stimulation on the earthquake-caused post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
The 91 PTSD patients in Wenchuan hit by a strong earthquake were randomly divided into a control group of 24 cases treated by the cognitive-behavior therapy, and a treatment group of 67 cases treated by both cognitive-behavior therapy and acupoint stimulation. The scores were evaluated according to Chinese version of the incident effect scale revised (IES-R) and the self-compiled questionnaire for the major post-traumatic psychological condition, and the curative effect was compared between the two groups.
The total scores of IES-R, the scores of all factors and the total scores of the questionnaire in the two groups after treatment were much lower than those before treatment (P < 0.01). The comparison of reduction in the factor scores between the two groups showed that the curative effect in the treatment group was better that of in the control group.
The acupoint stimulation is effective for the PTSD patients, with better results than that of cognitive-behavior therapy used alone.

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