Article

The genetic and environmental covariation among psychopathic personality traits, and reactive and proactive aggression in childhood.

Washington University School of Medicine, USA.
Child Development (Impact Factor: 4.92). 05/2011; 82(4):1267-81. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01598.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The present study investigated the genetic and environmental covariance between psychopathic personality traits with reactive and proactive aggression in 9- to 10-year-old twins (N = 1,219). Psychopathic personality traits were assessed with the Child Psychopathy Scale (D. R. Lynam, 1997), while aggressive behaviors were assessed using the Reactive Proactive Questionnaire (A. Raine et al., 2006). Significant common genetic influences were found to be shared by psychopathic personality traits and aggressive behaviors using both caregiver (mainly mother) and child self-reports. Significant genetic and nonshared environmental influences specific to psychopathic personality traits and reactive and proactive aggression were also found, suggesting etiological independence among these phenotypes. Additionally, the genetic relation between psychopathic personality traits and aggression was significantly stronger for proactive than reactive aggression when using child self-reports.

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