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Statins are active in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL): a therapy that may treat ALL and prevent avascular necrosis.

Division of Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia Division of Hematology, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. E-mail: .
British Journal of Haematology (Impact Factor: 4.94). 05/2011; 155(3):403-7. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2141.2011.08696.x
Source: PubMed
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Statins are HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors that act on the mevalonate pathway and inhibit synthesis of cholesterol, geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP) and farnesylpyrophospate (FPP). In preclinical studies, these agents have been shown to inhibit proliferation, trigger apoptosis and promote cell differentiation of leukemia. Proposed mechanisms include cholesterol deprivation and inhibition of isoprenylation of important signaling molecules. Case reports and early clinical studies suggest a therapeutic potential for statins in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the other leukemias, there is limited clinical data, but in vitro studies provide a strong rationale for future studies involving statins. The effects of statins on the immune system may lend these agents to a role in allogeneic stem cell transplant. While many of the studies are early, statins have the future potential to be integrated into conventional chemotherapy regimens with limited side effects.
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