Article

Pulsed radio frequency energy (PRFE) use in human medical applications.

Division of Plastic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital , Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine (Impact Factor: 0.77). 03/2011; 30(1):21-45. DOI: 10.3109/15368378.2011.566775
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A number of electromagnetic field-based technologies are available for therapeutic medical applications. These therapies can be broken down into different categories based on technical parameters employed and type of clinical application. Pulsed radio frequency energy (PRFE) therapy is a non invasive, electromagnetic field-based therapeutic that is based on delivery of pulsed, shortwave radio frequency energy in the 13-27.12 MHz carrier frequency range, and designed for local application to a target tissue without the intended generation of deep heat. It has been studied for use in a number of clinical applications, including as a palliative treatment for both postoperative and non postoperative pain and edema, as well as in wound healing applications. This review provides an introduction to the therapy, a summary of clinical efficacy studies using the therapy in specific applications, and an overview of treatment-related safety.

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