In the clinic. Celiac disease

Annals of internal medicine (Impact Factor: 17.81). 05/2011; 154(9):ITC5-1-ITC5-15; quiz ITC5-16. DOI: 10.1059/0003-4819-154-9-201105030-01005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This issue provides a clinical overview of celiac disease focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. Readers can complete the accompanying CME quiz for 1.5 credits. Only ACP members and individual subscribers can access the electronic features of In the Clinic. Non-subscribers who wish to access this issue of In the Clinic can elect "Pay for View." Subscribers can receive 1.5 category 1 CME credits by completing the CME quiz that accompanies this issue of In the Clinic. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including PIER (Physicians' Information and Education Resource) and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing division and with assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from PIER and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult,, and other resources referenced within each issue of In the Clinic.

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    • "Clinical manifestations of CD may appear at any age, with gastrointestinal and/or extra-intestinal systemic symptoms, although some diagnoses can be made in asymptomatic individuals. Notably, a gluten-free diet (GFD) results in complete clinical remission and full recovery of the intestine in the vast majority of CD patients [28,29]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder, characterized by the presence of gastrointestinal and multisystem symptoms, which occasionally mimic those of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS). To assess the effectiveness of a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD) in seven adult female screening-detected CD subjects, categorized as severe IBS and FMS patients. All subjects showed villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies, were HLA-DQ2/DQ8-positive, and fulfilled the Rome III and ACR 1990 criteria respectively for IBS and FMS classification. GFD effectiveness was assessed at baseline and after 1 year, examining the score changes in the Tender Points (TPs) test, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) for gastrointestinal complaints, pain and tiredness, drug prescriptions and tissue-Trans-Glutaminase (tTG) serum levels. At baseline, all patients had poor Quality of Life and VAS scores, a high number of TPs and drug prescriptions, and increased tTG levels. After 1 year of GFD, all outcome measures significantly improved, with a decrease of 51-60% in TPs, FIQ, HAQ, and VAS scales, and in the number of prescribed drugs, accompanied by an increase of 48-60% in SF-36 Physical and Mental Component Summary scores, and a decrease of tTG to normal values. Results of this pilot study show that the adherence to a GFD by CD-related IBS/FMS patients can simultaneously improve CD and IBS/FMS symptoms, and indicate the merit of further research on a larger cohort.
    BMC Gastroenterology 11/2013; 13(1):157. DOI:10.1186/1471-230X-13-157 · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The literature suggests a lack of consensus on the use of terms related to coeliac disease (CD) and gluten. DESIGN: A multidisciplinary task force of 16 physicians from seven countries used the electronic database PubMed to review the literature for CD-related terms up to January 2011. Teams of physicians then suggested a definition for each term, followed by feedback of these definitions through a web survey on definitions, discussions during a meeting in Oslo and phone conferences. In addition to 'CD', the following descriptors of CD were evaluated (in alphabetical order): asymptomatic, atypical, classical, latent, non-classical, overt, paediatric classical, potential, refractory, silent, subclinical, symptomatic, typical, CD serology, CD autoimmunity, genetically at risk of CD, dermatitis herpetiformis, gluten, gluten ataxia, gluten intolerance, gluten sensitivity and gliadin-specific antibodies. RESULTS: CD was defined as 'a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy precipitated by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals'. Classical CD was defined as 'CD presenting with signs and symptoms of malabsorption. Diarrhoea, steatorrhoea, weight loss or growth failure is required.' 'Gluten-related disorders' is the suggested umbrella term for all diseases triggered by gluten and the term gluten intolerance should not to be used. Other definitions are presented in the paper. CONCLUSION: This paper presents the Oslo definitions for CD-related terms.
    Gut 02/2012; 62(1). DOI:10.1136/gutjnl-2011-301346 · 14.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) are two common central sensitization disorders frequently associated in the same patient, and some of these patients with IBS plus FMS (IBS/FMS) could actually be undiagnosed of celiac disease (CD). The present study was an active case finding for CD in two IBS cohorts, one constituted by IBS/FMS subjects and the other by people with isolated IBS. A total of 104 patients (89.4% females), fulfilling the 1990-ACR criteria for FMS and the Roma III criteria for IBS classification, and 125 unrelated, age and sex matched IBS no-FMS patients underwent the following studies: hematological, coagulation and biochemistry test, serological and genetic markers for CD (i.e., tissue-Transglutaminase-2, tTG-2, and major histocompatibility complex HLA-DQ2/DQ8); multiple gastric and duodenal biopsies; FMS tender points (TPs); fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ), health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), short form health survey (SF-36), and visual analogue scales (VAS) for tiredness and gastrointestinal complaints. As a whole, IBS/FMS patients scored much worse values in quality of life and VAS scales than those with isolated IBS (p <0.001). Seven subjects (6.7%) from the IBS/FMS group displayed DQ2/DQ8 positivity, high TGt-2 serum levels and duodenal villous atrophy, concordant with CD. Interestingly enough, these seven patients were started on a gluten-free diet (GFD), showing a remarkable improvement in their digestive and systemic symptoms on follow-up. The findings of this screening indicate that a non-negligible percentage of IBS/FMS patients are CD patients, who can improve symptoms and possibly prevent long-term CD-related complications with a strict lifelong GFD.
    Arthritis research & therapy 11/2013; 15(6):R201. DOI:10.1186/ar4391 · 3.75 Impact Factor
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