Article

A cryptic deletion in 5q31.2 provides further evidence for a minimally deleted region in myelodysplastic syndromes.

Victorian Cancer Cytogenetics Service, St. Vincent's Hospital (Melbourne), Fitzroy, VIC, Australia.
Cancer Genetics (Impact Factor: 2.42). 04/2011; 204(4):187-94. DOI: 10.1016/j.cancergen.2011.02.001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Recurrent deletions of 5q in myeloid malignancies encompass two separate regions: deletion of 5q33, which is associated with the 5q− syndrome and haploinsufficiency of RPS14, and deletion of a more proximal locus at 5q31. We present a case with a cryptic 1.3 Mb deletion in 5q31.2 identified by array comparative genomic hybridization that places the proximal boundary of the deletion proximal and close to the candidate EGR1 gene. The patient was diagnosed initially with a myelodysplastic syndrome, with a del(20)(q11.2q13.3) as the sole abnormality identified by karyotyping. The patient progressed to acute myeloid leukemia with no change to the G-banded karyotype. The 1.3 Mb deletion on the long arm of one chromosome 5 was confirmed to have been present both at presentation with myelodysplastic syndrome and at transformation. This is an interesting case because there are few array studies identifying cryptic 5q deletions, and the study of these small deletions helps to refine the common deleted region. This case, together with previously published studies, suggests that the proximal boundary of the common deleted region may lie within the KDM3B gene.

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