Article

Chikungunya Virus, Southeastern France

Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
Emerging Infectious Diseases (Impact Factor: 7.33). 05/2011; 17(5):910-3. DOI: 10.3201/eid1705.101873
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In September 2010, autochthonous transmission of chikungunya virus was recorded in southeastern France, where the Aedes albopictus mosquito vector is present. Sequence analysis of the viral genomes of imported and autochthonous isolates indicated new features for the potential emergence and spread of the virus in Europe.

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Available from: Isabelle Leparc-Goffart, Aug 05, 2014
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    • "). In Europe, this vector species was responsible for an epidemic of chikungunya fever with 217 confirmed cases in northern Italy in 2007 (Angelini et al. 2008), and 2 chikungunya fever cases locally transmitted from an imported case in France in 2010 (Grandadam et al. 2011). Autochthonous cases of dengue were reported in the south of metropolitan France in 2010 (La Ruche et al. 2010; Marchand et al. 2013), as well as in Croatia in 2010 (Gjenero-Margan et al. 2011). "
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    ABSTRACT: During an entomological investigation carried out in Bucharest and surroundings in fall of 2012, 45 adult mosquitoes (38 females and 7 males) of Aedes albopictus were collected in a neighborhood from the southern area of the city. The morphological identification of the species was further confirmed by sequencing 2 mitochondrial DNA markers: the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 genes. Aedes albopictus was collected again in 2013 in the same area from July until October. During late summer the species was found also in another location in the city, downtown Bucharest. Larvae were found in water barrels and other types of household containers, as well as in rain catch basins. In 2014, following a nuisance complaint of a Bucharest inhabitant, the entomological investigation found aggressive Ae. albopictus adults on his property that harbored many mosquito larvae in container-type breeding habitats. These findings are the 1st records of this invasive species and of its breeding population in Romania, and show maintenance of the species over 2 winter seasons. Surveillance of the species outside the area of the capital city was not performed, therefore it is not known whether Ae. albopictus has been introduced in other regions of the country. The presence of Ae. albopictus has been reported every year (2012–14) to competent public health authorities, stressing on the importance of surveillance and of implementation of control measures.
    Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 07/2015; 31(2):177-181. DOI:10.2987/14-6462R · 0.83 Impact Factor
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    • "It is considered as one of the 100 most invasive species in the world (ISSG, 2009) and transmits important arboviruses for public health in tropical and temperate regions worldwide such as dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever (Gratz, 2004; Eritja et al., 2005), and is also a vector of filarial nematodes (e.g Dirofilaria spp.) (Cancrini et al., 2003). In the recent past, isolated cases of these viruses have occurred in Europe, specifically dengue and chikungunya (Grandadam et al., 2011; Marchand et al., 2013; INVS, 2014; Paty et al., 2014). Aedes albopictus was detected in mainland Spain in 2004 (Barcelona; Catalonia) (Aranda et al., 2006) and has been recorded along the Mediterranean coast of the Iberian Peninsula to Alicante (Roiz, et al. 2007), Castellon (Delacour- Estrella, 2010), Murcia (Collantes & Delgado, 2011), Valencia (Alarcon-Elbal et al., 2013), Andalusia (Delacour-Estrella et al., 2014) and recently in Basque Country (Delacour et al., 2015). "
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    ABSTRACT: Aedes (Stegomya) albopictus is an invasive mosquito native to tropical areas in Southeast Asia. It is an important vector of several pathogens of public and veterinary health significance. In 2004 this mosquito was recorded for the first time in Spain (Catalonia) and detected in Majorca (Balearic Islands) in 2012. In this paper, we report for the first time the presence of Ae. albopictus on the island of Ibiza ('Eivissa', Balearic Islands, Spain). The high volume of goods arriving by maritime transport and the increase of commercial trade and visitors during recent years have been identified as the most probable entry routes for the species on the Island. Journal of the European Mosquito Control Association 33: 1-4, 2015
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    • "It is considered as one of the 100 most invasive species in the world (ISSG, 2009) and transmits important arboviruses for public health in tropical and temperate regions worldwide such as dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever (Gratz, 2004; Eritja et al., 2005), and is also a vector of filarial nematodes (e.g Dirofilaria spp.) (Cancrini et al., 2003). In the recent past, isolated cases of these viruses have occurred in Europe, specifically dengue and chikungunya (Grandadam et al., 2011; Marchand et al., 2013; INVS, 2014; Paty et al., 2014). Aedes albopictus was detected in mainland Spain in 2004 (Barcelona; Catalonia) (Aranda et al., 2006) and has been recorded along the Mediterranean coast of the Iberian Peninsula to Alicante (Roiz, et al. 2007), Castellon (Delacour- Estrella, 2010), Murcia (Collantes & Delgado, 2011), Valencia (Alarcon-Elbal et al., 2013), Andalusia (Delacour-Estrella et al., 2014) and recently in Basque Country (Delacour et al., 2015). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aedes (Stegomya) albopictus is an invasive mosquito native to tropical areas in Southeast Asia. It is an important vector of several pathogens of public and veterinary health significance. In 2004 this mosquito was recorded for the first time in Spain (Catalonia) and detected in Majorca (Balearic Islands) in 2012. In this paper, we report for the first time the presence of Ae. albopictus on the island of Ibiza ('Eivissa', Balearic Islands, Spain). The high volume of goods arriving by maritime transport and the increase of commercial trade and visitors during recent years have been identified as the most probable entry routes for the species on the Island. Journal of the European Mosquito Control Association 33: 1-4, 2015
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