Article

Longitudinal evaluation the pulmonary function of the pre and postoperative periods in the coronary artery bypass graft surgery of patients treated with a physiotherapy protocol.

Post-Graduate Program in Cardiovascular Sciences, Fluminense Federal University, Niteroi, RJ, Brazil.
Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Impact Factor: 0.9). 01/2011; 6:62. DOI: 10.1186/1749-8090-6-62
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) seeks to reduce or prevent its complications and decrease morbidity and mortality. For certain subgroups of patients, coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) may accomplish these goals. The objective of this study was to assess the pulmonary function in the CABG postoperative period of patients treated with a physiotherapy protocol.
Forty-two volunteers with an average age of 63 ± 2 years were included and separated into three groups: healthy volunteers (n = 09), patients with CAD (n = 9) and patients who underwent CABG (n = 20). Patients from the CABG group received preoperative and postoperative evaluations on days 3, 6, 15 and 30. Patients from the CAD group had evaluations on days 1 and 30 of the study, and the healthy volunteers were evaluated on day 1. Pulmonary function was evaluated by measuring forced vital capacity (FVC), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) and Maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP).
After CABG, there was a significant decrease in pulmonary function (p < 0.05), which was the worst on postoperative day 3 and returned to the preoperative baseline on postoperative day 30.
Pulmonary function decreased after CABG. Pulmonary function was the worst on postoperative day 3 and began to improve on postoperative day 15. Pulmonary function returned to the preoperative baseline on postoperative day 30.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
111 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC) are a major cause of morbidity, mortality, prolonged hospital stay, and increased cost of care. Physiotherapy (PT) programs in post-surgical and critical area patients are aimed to reduce the risks of PPC due to long-term bed-rest, to improve the patient's quality of life and residual function, and to avoid new hospitalizations. At this purpose, PT programs apply advanced cost-effective therapeutic modalities to decrease complications and patient's ventilator-dependency. Strategies to reduce PPC include monitoring and reduction of risk factors, improving preoperative status, patient education, smoking cessation, intra-operative and postoperative pulmonary care. Different PT techniques, as a part of the comprehensive management of patients undergoing cardiac, upper abdominal, and thoracic surgery, may prevent and treat PPC such as secretion retention, atelectasis, and pneumonia.
    Multidisciplinary respiratory medicine 01/2013; 8(1):4. · 0.05 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We compared the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation with bilevel positive airway pressure added to usual care versus usual care alone in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. METHODS: We performed a 2-group, parallel, randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome was time until fit for discharge. Secondary outcomes were partial pressure of carbon dioxide, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, atelectasis, adverse events, duration of intensive care stay, and actual postoperative stay. RESULTS: A total of 129 patients were randomly allocated to bilevel positive airway pressure (66) or usual care (63). Three patients allocated to bilevel positive airway pressure withdrew. The median duration of bilevel positive airway pressure was 16 hours (interquartile range, 11-19). The median duration of hospital stay until fit for discharge was 5 days for the bilevel positive airway pressure group (interquartile range, 4-6) and 6 days for the usual care group (interquartile range, 5-7; hazard ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.31; P = .019). There was no significant difference in duration of intensive care, actual postoperative stay, and mean percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second on day 3. Mean partial pressure of carbon dioxide was significantly reduced 1 hour after bilevel positive airway pressure application, but there was no overall difference between the groups up to 24 hours. Basal atelectasis occurred in 15 patients (24%) in the usual care group and 2 patients (3%) in the bilevel positive airway pressure group. Overall, 30% of patients in the bilevel positive airway pressure group experienced an adverse event compared with 59% in the usual care group. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting, the use of bilevel positive airway pressure at extubation reduced the recovery time. Supported by trained staff, more than 75% of all patients allocated to bilevel positive airway pressure tolerated it for more than 10 hours.
    The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery 04/2013; · 3.41 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Pak J Med Sci. 01/2011; 27(5):971-75.

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
23 Downloads
Available from
May 31, 2014