Ovarian hormone loss induces bioenergetic deficits and mitochondrial β-amyloid. Neurobiol Aging

Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.
Neurobiology of aging (Impact Factor: 5.01). 04/2011; 33(8):1507-21. DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2011.03.001
Source: PubMed


Previously, we demonstrated that reproductive senescence was associated with mitochondrial deficits comparable to those of female triple-transgenic Alzheimer's mice (3xTgAD). Herein, we investigated the impact of chronic ovarian hormone deprivation and 17β-estradiol (E2) replacement on mitochondrial function in nontransgenic (nonTg) and 3xTgAD female mouse brain. Depletion of ovarian hormones by ovariectomy (OVX) in nontransgenic mice significantly decreased brain bioenergetics, and induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. In 3xTgAD mice, OVX significantly exacerbated mitochondrial dysfunction and induced mitochondrial β-amyloid and β-amyloid (Aβ)-binding-alcohol-dehydrogenase (ABAD) expression. Treatment with E2 at OVX prevented OVX-induced mitochondrial deficits, sustained mitochondrial bioenergetic function, decreased oxidative stress, and prevented mitochondrial β-amyloid and ABAD accumulation. In vitro, E2 increased maximal mitochondrial respiration in neurons and basal and maximal respiration in glia. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ovarian hormone loss induced a mitochondrial phenotype comparable to a transgenic female model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which was prevented by E2. These findings provide a plausible mechanism for increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in premenopausally oophorectomized women while also suggesting a therapeutic strategy for prevention.

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    • "Brain oxidative stress increases with older age and it is a proposed link between aging and AD (Viña et al., 2004). Ovarian hormone loss induces mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in ovariectomized mice (Yao et al., 2012), in line with the above mentioned induction of premature aging. Oxidative imbalance of Tg female mice increases with the mouse age and AD-like pathology severity, with progressively increased levels of lipoperoxides and oxidized glutathione (Resende et al., 2008; Yao et al., 2009, 2012; García-Mesa et al., 2011, 2012). "
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    ABSTRACT: Postmenopausal women may be more vulnerable to cognitive loss and Alzheimer's disease (AD) than premenopausal women because of their deficiency in estrogens, in addition to their usually older age. Aerobic physical exercise has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for maintaining health and well-being in postmenopausal women, and for improving brain health and plasticity in populations at high risk for AD. To study the neuroprotective mechanisms of physical exercise in a postmenopausal animal model, we submitted previously ovariectomized, six-month old non-transgenic and 3xTg-AD mice to three months of voluntary exercise in a running wheel. At nine months of age, we observed lower grip strength and some exacerbation of the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD)-like involving active exploratory activities. A similar major cognitive impairment was observed of ovariectomized 3xTg-AD mice in comparison with sham-operated 3xTg-AD mice. A reduction of bodily fitness and lack of retention of memory were observed in the ovariectomized non-transgenic mice. Physical exercise protected against all deleterious behaviors and normalized learning and memory. It also protected against body frailty, as expected. Analyses of hippocampal key markers of antioxidant and neuroplasticity signaling pathways, showed that ovariectomy impairs the activation of CREB through physical exercise. Furthermore, molecular and behavioral correlates suggested a central role of BDNF in the neuroprotection mediated by physical exercise therapy against apathy and memory loss induced by ovariectomy and the AD-genotype.
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 07/2014; 45. DOI:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2014.03.021 · 4.94 Impact Factor
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    • "In the placenta and in ovaries, ABAD inactivates estradiol by oxidizing it to estrone [31], [32], and this may also occurs in testis [33]. Interestingly, ABAD levels themselves are sensitive to estradiol levels suggesting a feedback loop in the regulation of its activity [34]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a conformational disease that is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain. Aβ exerts its toxicity in part by receptor-mediated interactions that cause down-stream protein misfolding and aggregation, as well as mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent reports indicate that Aβ may also interact directly with intracellular proteins such as the mitochondrial enzyme ABAD (Aβ binding alcohol dehydrogenase) in executing its toxic effects. Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early in AD, and Aβ's toxicity is in part mediated by inhibition of ABAD as shown previously with an ABAD decoy peptide. Here, we employed AG18051, a novel small ABAD-specific compound inhibitor, to investigate the role of ABAD in Aβ toxicity. Using SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we found that AG18051 partially blocked the Aβ-ABAD interaction in a pull-down assay while it also prevented the Aβ42-induced down-regulation of ABAD activity, as measured by levels of estradiol, a known hormone and product of ABAD activity. Furthermore, AG18051 is protective against Aβ42 toxicity, as measured by LDH release and MTT absorbance. Specifically, AG18051 reduced Aβ42-induced impairment of mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress as shown by reduced ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels. Guided by our previous finding of shared aspects of the toxicity of Aβ and human amylin (HA), with the latter forming aggregates in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) pancreas, we determined whether AG18051 would also confer protection from HA toxicity. We found that the inhibitor conferred only partial protection from HA toxicity indicating distinct pathomechanisms of the two amyloidogenic agents. Taken together, our results present the inhibition of ABAD by compounds such as AG18051 as a promising therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of AD, and suggest levels of estradiol as a suitable read-out.
    PLoS ONE 12/2011; 6(12):e28887. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0028887 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    • "They also observed that LTED induced formation of mitochondrial β-amyloid and expression of mitochondrial β-amyloid-binding-alcohol-dehydrogenase, further connecting LTED with AD development [196]. Importantly, this phenotype was prevented by replacement of E2 in ovariectomized mice, which suggests that HT may alleviate the increased risk of AD development in postmenopausal women if treatment is initiated close to the onset of menopause [196]. "
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    ABSTRACT: 17β-Estradiol (estradiol or E2) is implicated as a neuroprotective factor in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying E2 neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia, as well as emerging evidence from basic science and clinical studies, which suggests that there is a "critical period" for estradiol's beneficial effect in the brain. Potential mechanisms underlying the critical period are discussed, as are the neurological consequences of long-term E2 deprivation (LTED) in animals and in humans after natural menopause or surgical menopause. We also summarize the major clinical trials concerning postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT), comparing their outcomes with respect to cardiovascular and neurological disease and discussing their relevance to the critical period hypothesis. Finally, potential caveats, controversies and future directions for the field are highlighted and discussed throughout the review.
    Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology 11/2011; 33(1):85-104. DOI:10.1016/j.yfrne.2011.10.001 · 7.04 Impact Factor
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