Article

3T MR neurography using three-dimensional diffusion-weighted PSIF: Technical issues and advantages

The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, 601 North Caroline Street, Room 4214, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.
Skeletal Radiology (Impact Factor: 1.74). 04/2011; 40(10):1355-60. DOI: 10.1007/s00256-011-1162-y
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Three-dimensional (3D) diffusion-weighted reversed fast imaging with steady state precession (3D DW-PSIF) MR sequence has the potential to create nerve-specific images. The authors describe the technical issues and their initial experience with this imaging technique employed for peripheral MR neurography.

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