Article

Patient Outcomes With Endovascular Embolectomy Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke A Study of the National Inpatient Sample: 2006 to 2008

Mayo Clinic, OL 1-115, 200 SW First Street, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
Stroke (Impact Factor: 6.02). 06/2011; 42(6):1648-52. DOI: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.607952
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Maturing techniques have spurred widespread implementation of endovascular embolectomy therapy for ischemic stroke. We evaluated a large administrative database to determine outcomes in patients treated with endovascular embolectomy in the general population.
Using the National Inpatient Sample, we evaluated outcomes of patients treated for acute ischemic stroke in the United States from 2006 to 2008. Patients who had an ischemic stroke and underwent endovascular clot retrieval were identified. Morbidity, defined as "discharge to long-term facility," and mortality were evaluated as a function of patient age and of concomitant thrombolytic agent administration.
For 2006 to 2008, a total of 3864 patients received endovascular clot retrieval with 266 (6.9%) patients in 2006, 800 (20.7) patients in 2007, and 2798 (72.4%) patients in 2008. The discharge to a long-term facility rate was 51.3% (1983 of 3864). The in-hospital mortality rate was 24.3% (940 of 3864). For patients <65 years old, the rate of in-hospital death was 17.1% (283 of 1658) as compared with a rate of 29.7% (656 of 2206) for patients ≥65 years old (P<0.0001). The rate of discharge to a long-term facility was 47.6% (789 of 1658) for patients <65 years old and 54.1% (1193 of 2206) for patients ≥65 years old (P<0.0001). The rate of intracranial hemorrhage was 15.5% without concomitant thrombolysis and 20.0% with concomitant thrombolysis (P=0.0009).
Rates of morbidity and mortality remain high for patients with acute stroke, even in the setting of endovascular embolectomy. Advanced age portends a worse outcome and patients treated with concomitant use of thrombolytic agent had higher rates of intracranial hemorrhage than those without such therapy.

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