Article

Prevalence and correlates of premature ejaculation in a primary care setting: A preliminary cross-sectional study

Bayan Baru Health Clinic, Bayan Baru, Penang, Malaysia Department of Primary Care Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Journal of Sexual Medicine (Impact Factor: 3.15). 04/2011; 8(7):2071-8. DOI: 10.1111/j.1743-6109.2011.02280.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Premature ejaculation (PE) is common. However, it has been underreported and undertreated.
To determine the prevalence of PE and to investigate possible associated factors of PE.
This cross-sectional study was conducted at a primary care clinic over a 3-month period in 2008. Men aged 18-70 years attending the clinic were recruited, and they completed self-administered questionnaires that included the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT), International Index of Erectile Function, sociodemography, lifestyle, and medical illness. The operational definition of PE included PE and probable PE based on the PEDT.
Prevalence of PE.
A total of 207 men were recruited with a response rate of 93.2%. There were 97 (46.9%) Malay, 57 (27.5%) Chinese, and 53 (25.6%) Indian, and their mean age was 46.0 ± 12.7 years. The prevalence of PE was 40.6% (N = 82) (PE: 20.3%, probable PE: 20.3% using PEDT). A significant association was found between ethnicity and PE (Indian 49.1%, Malay 45.4%, and Chinese 24.6%; χ(2) = 8.564, d.f. = 2, P = 0.014). No significant association was found between age and PE. Multivariate analysis showed that erectile dysfunction (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 4.907, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.271, 10.604), circumcision (adjusted OR 4.881, 95% CI 2.346, 10.153), sexual intercourse ≤5 times in 4 weeks (adjusted OR 3.733, 95% CI 1.847, 7.544), and Indian ethnicity (adjusted OR 3.323, 95% CI 1.489, 7.417) were predictors of PE.
PE might be frequent in men attending primary care clinics. We found that erectile dysfunction, circumcision, Indian ethnicity, and frequency of sexual intercourse of ≤5 times per month were associated with PE. These associations need further confirmation.

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    • "Indeed, Bollinger and Van Howe [20] also found that circumcised men are 2.56 times more likely than genitally intact men, to suffer from premature ejaculation (cf. Tang & Khoo) [26]. At least 10 studies have been published comparing PE prevalence in genitally intact versus circumcised men [24] [27]-[35]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Morris and Krieger (2013) have argued that male circumcision does not impact adversely on sexual sensation, satisfaction, and/or function. In the present paper, it is argued that such a view is untenable. By selectively citing Morris' own non-peer-reviewed letters and opinion pieces purporting to show flaws in studies reporting evidence of negative effects of circumcision, and by failing adequately to account for replies to these letters by the authors of the original research (and others), Morris and Krieger give an incomplete and misleading account of the available literature. Consequently, Morris and Krieger reach an implausible conclusion that is inconsistent with what is known about the anatomy and functions of the penile foreskin, and the likely effects of its surgical removal.
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    • "Indeed, Bollinger and Van Howe [20] also found that circumcised men are 2.56 times more likely than genitally intact men, to suffer from premature ejaculation (cf. Tang & Khoo) [26]. At least 10 studies have been published comparing PE prevalence in genitally intact versus circumcised men [24] [27]-[35]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Morris and Krieger (2013) have argued that male circumcision does not impact adversely on sexual sensation, satisfaction, and/or function. In the present paper, it is argued that such a view is untenable. By selectively citing Morris' own non-peer-reviewed letters and opinion pieces purporting to show flaws in studies reporting evidence of negative effects of circumcision, and by failing adequately to account for replies to these letters by the authors of the original research (and others), Morris and Krieger give an incomplete and misleading account of the available literature. Consequently, Morris and Krieger reach an implausible conclusion that is inconsistent with what is known about the anatomy and functions of the penile foreskin, and the likely effects of its surgical removal.
    Advances in Sexual Medicine 05/2015; 5(02):7-12. DOI:10.4236/asm.2015.52002
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    ABSTRACT: Over the past 20 years our knowledge of premature ejaculation (PE) has significantly advanced. Specifically, we have witnessed substantial progress in understanding the physiology of ejaculation, clarifying the real prevalence of PE in population-based studies, reconceptualizing the definition and diagnostic criterion of the disorder, assessing the psychosocial impact on patients and partners, designing validated diagnostic and outcome measures, proposing new pharmacologic strategies and examining the efficacy, safety and satisfaction of these new and established therapies. Given the abundance of high level research it seemed like an opportune time for the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) to promulgate an evidenced-based, comprehensive and practical set of clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of PE. Develop clearly worded, practical, evidenced-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of PE for family practice clinicians as well as sexual medicine experts. Method.  Review of the literature. This article contains the report of the ISSM PE Guidelines Committee. It affirms the ISSM definition of PE and suggests that the prevalence is considerably lower than previously thought. Evidence-based data regarding biological and psychological etiology of PE are presented, as is population-based statistics on normal ejaculatory latency. Brief assessment procedures are delineated and validated diagnostic and treatment questionnaires are reviewed. Finally, the best practices treatment recommendations are presented to guide clinicians, both familiar and unfamiliar with PE, in facilitating treatment of their patients. Development of guidelines is an evolutionary process that continually reviews data and incorporates the best new research. We expect that ongoing research will lead to a more complete understanding of the pathophysiology as well as new efficacious and safe treatments for this sexual dysfunction. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that these guidelines be re-evaluated and updated by the ISSM every 4 years.
    Journal of Sexual Medicine 09/2010; 7(9):2947-69. · 3.15 Impact Factor
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