Article

Community health care: therapeutic opportunities in the human microbiome.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
Science translational medicine (Impact Factor: 14.41). 04/2011; 3(78):78ps12. DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3001626
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We are never alone. Humans coexist with diverse microbial species that live within and upon us--our so-called microbiota. It is now clear that this microbial community is essentially another organ that plays a fundamental role in human physiology and disease. Basic and translational research efforts have begun to focus on deciphering mechanisms of microbiome function--and learning how to manipulate it to benefit human health. In this Perspective, we discuss therapeutic opportunities in the human microbiome.

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