Article

AFQ056 Treatment of Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesias: Results of 2 Randomized Controlled Trials

University of Tübingen, Hertie-Institute of Clinical Brain Research and German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Tübingen, Germany.
Movement Disorders (Impact Factor: 5.63). 06/2011; 26(7):1243-50. DOI: 10.1002/mds.23616
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Study objectives were to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of AFQ056 in Parkinson's disease patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesia. Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, in-patient studies for Parkinson's disease patients with moderate to severe levodopa-induced dyskinesia (study 1) and severe levodopa-induced dyskinesia (study 2) on stable dopaminergic therapy were performed. Patients received 25-150 mg AFQ056 or placebo twice daily for 16 days (both studies). Study 2 included a 4-day down-titration. Primary outcomes were the Lang-Fahn Activities of Daily Living Dyskinesia Scale (study 1), the modified Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (study 2), and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-part III (both studies). Secondary outcomes included the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-part IV items 32-33. The primary analysis was change from baseline to day 16 on all outcomes. Treatment differences were assessed. Fifteen patients were randomized to AFQ056 and 16 to placebo in study 1; 14 patients were randomized to each group in study 2. AFQ056-treated patients showed significant improvements in dyskinesias on day 16 versus placebo (eg, Lang-Fahn Activities of Daily Living Dyskinesia Scale, P = .021 [study 1]; modified Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale, P = .032 [study 2]). No significant changes were seen from baseline on day 16 on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-part III in either study. Adverse events were reported in both studies, including dizziness. Serious adverse events (most commonly worsening of dyskinesias, apparently associated with stopping treatment) were reported by 4 AFQ056-treated patients in study 1, and 3 patients (2 AFQ056-treated patient and 1 in the placebo group) in study 2. AFQ056 showed a clinically relevant and significant antidyskinetic effect without changing the antiparkinsonian effects of dopaminergic therapy. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

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