Article

Persistent activation of Nrf2 through p62 in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8501, Japan.
The Journal of Cell Biology (Impact Factor: 10.82). 04/2011; 193(2):275-84. DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201102031
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Suppression of autophagy is always accompanied by marked accumulation of p62, a selective autophagy substrate. Because p62 interacts with the Nrf2-binding site on Keap1, which is a Cullin 3-based ubiquitin ligase adapter protein, autophagy deficiency causes competitive inhibition of the Nrf2-Keap1 interaction, resulting in stabilization of Nrf2 followed by transcriptional activation of Nrf2 target genes. Herein, we show that liver-specific autophagy-deficient mice harbor adenomas linked to both the formation of p62- and Keap1-positive cellular aggregates and induction of Nrf2 targets. Importantly, similar aggregates were identified in more than 25% of human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), and induction of Nrf2 target genes was recognized in most of these tumors. Gene targeting of p62 in an HCC cell line markedly abrogates the anchorage-independent growth, whereas forced expression of p62, but not a Keap1 interaction-defective mutant, resulted in recovery of the growth defect. These results indicate the involvement of persistent activation of Nrf2 through the accumulation of p62 in hepatoma development.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
336 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the main causes of chronic liver disease. Viral persistence and pathogenesis rely mainly on the ability of HCV to deregulate specific host processes, including lipid metabolism and innate immunity. Recently, autophagy has emerged as a cellular pathway, playing a role in several aspects of HCV infection. This review summarizes current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms that link the HCV life cycle with autophagy machinery. In particular, we discuss the role of HCV/autophagy interaction in dysregulating inflammation and lipid homeostasis and its potential for translational applications in the treatment of HCV-infected patients.
    BioMed Research International 01/2014; 2014:265353. · 2.71 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nrf2 has gained great attention with respect to its pivotal role in cell and tissue protection. Primarily defending cells against metabolic, xenobiotic and oxidative stress, Nrf2 is essential for maintaining tissue integrity. Owing to these functions, Nrf2 is regarded as a promising drug target in the chemoprevention of diseases, including cancer. However, much evidence has accumulated that the beneficial role of Nrf2 in cancer prevention essentially depends on the tight control of its activity. In fact, the deregulation of Nrf2 is a critical determinant in oncogenesis and found in many types of cancer. Therefore, amplified Nrf2 activity has profound effects on the phenotype of tumor cells, including radio/chemoresistance, apoptosis protection, invasiveness, antisenescence, autophagy deficiency, and angiogenicity. The deregulation of Nrf2 can result from various epigenetic and genetic alterations directly affecting Nrf2 control or from the complex interplay of Nrf2 with numerous oncogenic signaling pathways. Additionally, alterations of the cellular environment, eg, during inflammation, contribute to Nrf2 deregulation and its persistent activation. Therefore, the status of Nrf2 as anti- or protumorigenic is defined by many different modalities. A better understanding of these modalities is essential for the safe use of Nrf2 as an activation target for chemoprevention on the one hand and as an inhibition target in cancer therapy on the other. The present review mainly addresses the conditions that promote the oncogenic function of Nrf2 and the resulting consequences providing the rationale for using Nrf2 as a target structure in cancer therapy.
    OncoTargets and Therapy 01/2014; 7:1497-518. · 2.07 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL-2 is characteristic of human follicular lymphoma (FL) and some cases of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We aimed to determine autophagy status in primary FL and DLBCL samples and the BCL-2+/BCL-2- lymphoma cell lines using both autophagy PCR array and tissue microarray (TMA). A greater number of autophagy machinery genes were up-regulated in the BCL-2+ Su-DHL4 cell line compared with BCL-2- Su-DHL8 cells, at both the basal level and in response to autophagic stress. The autophagy-related gene expression profiles were determined in purified and unpurified malignant human lymph node biopsies. Seven autophagy machinery genes were up-regulated in purified FL B-cells compared with reactive B-cells. Only 2 autophagy machinery genes were up-regulated in DLBCL B-cells. In unpurified tissue biopsies, 20 of 46 genes in FL and 2 of 5 genes in DLBCL with increased expression were autophagy machinery genes. Expression of autophagy substrates p62 and LC3 were determined by TMAs. FL samples showed significantly decreased levels of both p62 and LC3 compared with reactive and DLBCL, indicative of an increased autophagy activity in FL. In summary, these results demonstrate that FL showed increased basal autophagy activity, regardless of overexpression of BCL-2 in this disease.
    Oncotarget 10/2014; · 6.64 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
67 Downloads
Available from
May 22, 2014