Review of ceftaroline fosamil microbiology: Integrated FOCUS studies

Cerexa, Inc., Oakland, CA 94612, USA.
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (Impact Factor: 5.31). 04/2011; 66 Suppl 3(Supplement 3):iii45-51. DOI: 10.1093/jac/dkr098
Source: PubMed


Ceftaroline fosamil, the prodrug form of ceftaroline, is a novel broad-spectrum parenteral cephalosporin that exhibits antibacterial
activity against typical respiratory pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus and common Gram-negative pathogens. In particular, ceftaroline has activity against resistant Gram-positive cocci, including
penicillin- and multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae, as well as methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The activity of ceftaroline against these phenotypes is attributed to its ability to bind to modified penicillin-binding
proteins with high affinity when compared with other β-lactams. The activity of ceftaroline is not compromised by the ability
of H. influenzae to produce β-lactamase. Ceftaroline fosamil was compared with ceftriaxone for safety and efficacy in two randomized, double-blinded,
controlled Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Microbiological assessments
at baseline included respiratory specimen cultures, blood cultures, urinary antigen testing and atypical pathogen serology
testing. By-subject and by-pathogen microbiological outcomes were assessed in the microbiologically evaluable population at
the test-of-cure visit. The favourable microbiological response rates by subject for ceftaroline were 87.0% compared with
81.0% for ceftriaxone. The by-pathogen microbiological response rates of ceftaroline and ceftriaxone were 87.3% and 72.9%
for S. pneumoniae, 83.3% and 85.0% for H. influenzae and 76.0% and 70.4% for S. aureus, respectively. Key baseline pathogens such as S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus were susceptible to ceftaroline, with MIC90s of 0.03, 0.03 and 0.25 mg/L, respectively, supporting its utility as a promising new agent for treatment of CAP.

Download full-text


Available from: Hillel David Friedland,
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and potential long-term mortality. Although the majority of patients with CAP are treated as outpatients, the greatest proportion of pneumonia-related mortality and healthcare expenditure occurs among the patients who are hospitalized. There has been considerable interest in determining risk factors and severity criteria assessments to assist with site-of-care decisions. For both inpatients and outpatients, the most common pathogens associated with CAP include Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, group A streptococci and Moraxella catarrhalis. Atypical pathogens, Gram-negative bacilli, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and viruses are also recognized aetiological agents of CAP. Despite the availability of antimicrobial therapies, the recent emergence of drug-resistant pneumococcal and staphylococcal isolates has limited the effectiveness of currently available agents. Because early and rapid initiation of empirical antimicrobial treatment is critical for achieving a favourable outcome in CAP, newer agents with activity against drug-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae and MRSA are needed for the management of patients with CAP.
    Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 04/2011; 66 Suppl 3(supplement 3):iii3-9. DOI:10.1093/jac/dkr094 · 5.31 Impact Factor
  • Source

    01/2012; DOI:10.4137/CMRT.S1658
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline) was recently approved for the treatment of community- acquired pneumonia (CAP) and complicated skin infections. This newly developed cephalosporin possesses a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Most importantly, ceftaroline demonstrates potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. In two Phase III, double-blinded, randomized, prospective trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2), ceftaroline was shown to be non-inferior to ceftriaxone for the treatment of CAP in hospitalized patients. Ceftaroline exhibits low resistance rates and a safety profile similar to that of other cephalosporins. In this review, we will evaluate the pharmacological characteristics, safety, antimicrobial properties, and efficacy of ceftaroline and its applications in the treatment of CAP.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 02/2012; 5(1):43-51. DOI:10.2147/IDR.S17433
Show more